A Travellerspoint blog

Bradford - The Wool Capital of the World.

Bradford Cathedral.

Bradford Cathedral.

Bradford.

We visited Bradford in February 2015, because my husband's football team was playing there. We stayed in the city overnight. Bradford is located in West Yorkshire and there are lots of interesting places nearby which we did not have time to visit such as Leeds, Ilkley, Saltaire, Keighley. We got there by taking the Carlisle Settle Railway to Shipley and changing train. This historic railway line passed some spectacular scenery. Bradford means broad ford and its name refers to a place where the Bradford Beck could be easily crossed. This area, near the present day Bradford Cathedral, was the original site of the settlement of Bradford which grew up around a church located here. By the middle ages Bradford, had developed into a small town which was centred on Kirkgate, Westgate and Ivegate. In the English Civil War the town of Bradford supported the Parliamentarians. In 1642 the Royalists besieged Bradford using Bolling Hall as their headquarters. Bradford was eventually forced to surrender to the Royalist troops. After the Industrial Revolution, Bradford became a centre for wool production. Many woollen mills were built in the city and it became known as the wool capital of the world.

Bradford was a mixed experience for me. I have developed a liking for visiting former industrial cities in the UK which have successfully reinvented themselves such as Liverpool, Sheffield, and Stoke. I was expecting the same from Bradford, but this was not the case. We stayed right in the centre of Bradford and to get to our hotel on Canal Road we had to walk past rows of derelict mills with boarded up windows. It was horrible, a real eyesore and I could not believe so little had been done to improve the area. There were some hopeful signs though as some of the mills had signs up stating they were to be converted into flats. On the other hand, the city centre area around Westgate, Ivegate and Kirkgate has some beautiful old buildings and the cathedral is lovely. I also visited Bolling Hall, Bowling Park, Lister Park and the Cartwright Hall; all of which were lovely. In short I would say that Bradford is a city you should research before visiting, so you know where to go and do not leave disappointed.

Here's where we stayed:

Ibis Budget Hotel.

We stayed in this hotel for one night in February 2015. The hotel is situated on a busy street called Canal Road within easy walking distance of Forster Square Station. Although this hotel is in the centre of the city its surroundings are a bit run down with lots of derelict mills. We went to Bradford so my husband could go to a football match and the hotel is not far from Bradford City Football Ground. We chose this hotel so we could use a hotel voucher we had acquired with Accor Hotel points. We did not realise we could not use the voucher in an Ibis Budget Hotel. The receptionist would not accept the voucher when we checked in. Our room was basic but comfortable enough. It was cold during our stay but the heating in the room soon warmed us up. I was very pleased that the hotel was very quiet at night and I slept really well here. We had constant hot water and enjoyed the shower. The room has no added extras such as a kettle, fridge or safe. I think the only toiletry provision was soap. However, it was clean and quite comfortable. The main downside of this hotel were the busy road it was on and the derelict mills on the opposite side of the road from it. On the plus side it was an easy walk from this hotel into the centre of Bradford and the hotel was opposite a Tesco, a Farmfoods and an Aldi. The hotel provided a basic breakfast at an extra charge, but we did not have it. There were some food and drink dispensing machines in the hotel lobby. There were no restaurants near this hotel except a McDonald's and an Oliver's Super Sandwiches. The staff at this hotel were fairly pleasant and friendly. The hotel provided free wifi which worked quite well. I would stay here again as it was clean and quiet. I rate it as average because it was quite basic and not in the most scenic area. Address: Bradford Business Park, Bradford, BD1 4SJ, United Kingdom

Here's where we visited:

Bradford Cathedral.

We walked all the way to Bradford Cathedral in the rain only to find it closed, so we continued up the hill for a quick look at Little Germany. When we came back down in a mad hurry to get to the station to catch our train, the cathedral had opened and we were able to go inside and look around. However, we had to do it at incredible speed, not doing any justice at all to the building's beautiful interior or friendly, helpful staff. Bradford Cathedral is also known as the Cathedral Church of St Peter. It is Bradford's oldest building and is located on a site that has housed religious buildings since the eighth century. The Anglo-Saxons were the first to raise a church at this spot. This church was destroyed during the Norman Invasion in 1066. Then Alice de Laci built a second church which was destroyed three hundred years later by Scottish raiders. During the fourteenth century the church was rebuilt. Bradford Cathedral is a beautiful building and is well worth a visit. Entry is free, though you can give a donation.

Bradford Cathedral.

Bradford Cathedral.

Bradford Cathedral.

Bradford Cathedral.

Bradford Cathedral.

Bradford Cathedral.

Lister Park.

It was a cold day in February when we visited, but spring was just beginning to appear with white, yellow and purple crocuses bursting out of the grass and snowdrops swaying on the breeze. Spring flowers are my favourite so I Ioved it here. Lister Park was teeming with life. I waited for my husband by a bush near the stag statue and I got the fright of my life when a squirrel suddenly burst out of the bush right next to me, then a second, third fourth and fifth in rapid succession. They were great, racing up trees, playing around on the grass. After that we walked to the duck pond where one hungry duck followed me around looking at me pleadingly for food then berating me good and proper with his calls when I did not have any. The pond was full of ducks and geese. I thought Lister Park was the most beautiful place we visited in Bradford. I had read reviews of it which said it was lovely and reviews of it which said it was a muggers' paradise. I did not go there alone. I was with my husband, but there were women there alone and it did not seem particularly dangerous. The bottom part of the park runs parallel with the road and is not particularly isolated or lonely. One thing I liked about the park was its sculptures. In front of Cartwright Hall there were several: the goddess Diana, a rabbit and a bull, washing hanging out to dry, a stag, several lions, a statue of Samuel Cucliffe Lister a local industrialist and inventor, after whom the park is named and a monument to Titus Salt, an industrialist and reformer who created a village with decent living conditions for his workers in Saltaire. Next to Cartwright Hall there is also an Indian style Mughal Water Gardens.

Lister Park

Lister Park

Lister Park

Lister Park

Lister Park

Lister Park

Lister Park

Lister Park

Lister Park

Lister Park

Lister Park the Flora

Lister Park the Flora

Lister Park the Flora

Lister Park the Flora

Lister Park the Flora

Lister Park the Flora

Lister Park the Flora

Lister Park the Flora

Lister Park the Flora

Lister Park the Flora

Lister Park the Fauna

Lister Park the Fauna

Lister Park the Fauna

Lister Park the Fauna

Lister Park the Fauna

Lister Park the Fauna

Lister Park the Fauna

Lister Park the Fauna

Lister Park the Fauna

Lister Park the Fauna

Cartwright Hall.

On the Sunday morning of our stay we took a walk to Lister Garden and Cartwright Hall. I thought Cartwright Hall was an old stately home but it turned out to be a purpose built art gallery. We knew it would be closed on a Sunday morning, but were more interested in seeing the building and its grounds than the art work inside. Cartwright Hall was designed by architects Sir John W. Simpson and E.J. Milner Allen, who also designed another building close to my heart Glasgow's Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. Cartwright Hall was opened in 1904. It was named after Edmund Cartwright, the inventor of the power loom. Cartwright Hall is free entry and is open on Tuesday to Friday 10.00 -16.00 and Saturday and Sunday 11.00 -16.00.

Cartwright Hall

Cartwright Hall

Cartwright Hall

Cartwright Hall

Cartwright Hall

Cartwright Hall

Cartwright Hall

Cartwright Hall

The Alhambra Theatre.

Not far from Bradford City Hall stands the Alhambra Theatre. This was built in 1914. It is a popular entertainment venue hosting ballets, operas, plays, pantomimes and much, much more.

The Alhambra Theatre

The Alhambra Theatre

The Alhambra Theatre

The Alhambra Theatre

Bradford City Hall.

I really did not do justice to the nicer part of Bradford city Centre. I walked through it the first time looking for Wakefield Road, the major road that goes in the direction of Bolling Hall. The second time I was in a rush to get back to the hotel to meet up with my husband, brother-in-law and nephew after their football match. The final times were when we went out for dinner in the evening. On those occasions I did notice several lovely old buildings such as the wool exchange, but I did not take photos as my camera is not great on night shots. I did spend a bit of time looking at the city hall and Centenary Square however. City Hall was not at its best. It was being renovated and was covered in scaffolding. Bradford City Hall dates from the nineteenth century. It is an impressive building with a tall clock tower. It was designed by architects, Lockwood and Mawson, and originally opened in 1873. Behind the city hall there were some pretty animal mosaics. In front of the city hall there was a large pool. You can take a pretty picture of the hall and its reflection here. There were also some sculptures.

Bradford City Hall

Bradford City Hall

Bradford City Hall

Bradford City Hall

Bradford City Hall

Bradford City Hall

Bradford City Hall

Bradford City Hall

Bradford City Hall

Bradford City Hall

Bowling Park.

Bowling Park is located in front of Bolling Hall and used to be part of the hall's grounds. It is a pleasant open space with children's play areas and pretty walks. I had a quick wander around before visiting Bolling Hall.

Bowling Park

Bowling Park

Bolling Hall.

I had it in my head that one of the main things I wanted to do was to visit Bolling Hall, so I went there while my husband went to the football. I had originally intended to get there by bus; apparently buses leave from Bradford Interchange Bus Station. On weekdays the 624 goes there; on weekends it is the 634. However, after reading that Bolling Hall was only a mile south of the city centre I decided just to walk there. This was not entirely a good idea as my husband is normally the map reader and trying to find it on my own I got lost several times. I certainly ended up walking a lot more than a mile. Bolling Hall is one of the oldest buildings in Bradford. It is first mentioned in the Domesday Book in 1086 when it was owned by a man named Sindi. Later William the Conqueror gave Bolling Hall to Ilbert de Laci for his services in the battle of Hastings. In 1316 Bolling Hall was owned by William Bolling and stayed in the Bolling family for hundreds of years. It was lost temporarily by Robert Bolling during the War of the Roses. He fought for the Lancastrians and was punished by Edward IV by having his house and lands confiscated. He successfully got them back 11 years later in 1472. Robert Bolling's son Tristram inherited Bolling Hall in 1537. He married Beatrice Carverley. They only had one child a daughter called Rosamund. She married Richard Tempest in 1497 and on her father's death Bolling Hall passed to the Tempest family. It remained in the Tempest family until the seventeenth century.

Bolling Hall is now a museum and is amazingly free to enter. I say amazingly because it is really interesting inside and I am sure people would be willing to pay to visit. You can give a voluntary donation if you want to. When you enter you go straight into a small gift shop. Behind that are the kitchens. The ground floor also contains a great hall, a sitting room and a dining room. Upstairs there is a red bedroom with a bed designed by Thomas Chippendale, apparently this furniture was taken from another stately home and was not originally part of Bolling House. There is also a nursery, a blue bedroom, a civil war room and a ghost room. Of course when you are dealing with a house as old as Bolling Hall it has to be haunted.

One bedroom in Bolling Hall is known as the Ghost Room. During the English Civil War the people of Bradford sided with the Puritans, but the owners of Bolling Hall were Royalists. In December 1642 the Royalist army under the command of the Earl of Newcastle laid siege to Bradford. The Earl of Newcastle was invited by Sir Richard Tempest to stay at Bolling Hall. The angry Earl described at dinner that evening how he intended to put every man, woman and child to the sword in Bradford. That night as he slept he suddenly felt his bed clothes move and sensed a presence in his room. It was a sobbing woman and she beseeched him, 'Pity poor Bradford.' The Earl was so disturbed by this ghostly apparition that he only killed ten people when he later took control of Bradford. In recent times a local newspaper offered money to anyone brave enough to sleep in the ghost room overnight then share their experience with the paper. No-one took them up on it. I am not surprised just looking at that figure in the bed freaked me out. I kept expecting it to turn over and look at me.

Bolling Hall

Bolling Hall

Bolling Hall

Bolling Hall

Bolling Hall

Bolling Hall

Bolling Hall

Bolling Hall

Bolling Hall

Bolling Hall

Bolling Hall continued

Bolling Hall continued

Bolling Hall continued

Bolling Hall continued

Bolling Hall continued

Bolling Hall continued

Bolling Hall continued

Bolling Hall continued

Bolling Hall continued

Bolling Hall continued

The Ghost of Bolling Hall

The Ghost of Bolling Hall

The Ghost of Bolling Hall

The Ghost of Bolling Hall

The Ghost of Bolling Hal

The Ghost of Bolling Hal

The Ghost of Bolling Hal

The Ghost of Bolling Hal

The Ghost of Bolling Hall

The Ghost of Bolling Hall

Among these dark satanic mills.

I tend to like visiting former industrial cities. I think it is wonderful that we used to produce so much. Bradford was the wool capital of the world. Fantastic. But I need to be careful not to over romanticise; that achievement came at a price. In the hey day of the Industrial Revolution Bradford's mills would have been filled with poor, uneducated workers, many of them children. They would have worked long hours for pitiful wages. Bradford's factories would have belched out thick, choking, toxic fumes, the air inside the mills would have been filled with woollen fibres, children would have been killed or injured using or cleaning dangerous mill machinery. The life expectancy of a mill worker would have been very very low.
I thought it was sad to see the mills derelict. I would like to see them used for something. Maybe flats or even a museum to those who slaved away in them. I loved the sheep weather vane on top of one mill. I noticed the sheep played a prominent roll in some of the coats of arms in Bradford Cathedral, too.

Among These Dark Satanic Mills

Among These Dark Satanic Mills

Among These Dark Satanic Mills

Among These Dark Satanic Mills

Bradford Is Home To Bradford City Football Club.

My husband's purpose in coming to Bradford was to watch his team, Walsall, against Bradford City. It was a 1 - 1 draw. I did not go to the match but our hotel room overlooked the ground, so I got a good view of it.

Bradford Is Home To Bradford City Football Club

Bradford Is Home To Bradford City Football Club

The Carlisle Settle Railway.

We travelled to Bradford from Scotland. First we took a train from Glasgow to Carlisle. From Carlisle we travelled on the Carlisle Settle Line to Skipton then changed for a train to Bradford. The Carlisle Settle Railway was the last major railway line built in Britain. It crosses the Yorkshire Dales and has some stunning scenery as well as historical station buildings. Our journey to Bradford was in clear cold weather. On our journey back the next day everything was covered in snow. The Carlisle Settle Railway was constructed in the 1870's. The line is 72 miles long and connects Leeds to Carlisle. It is considered to be a masterpiece of Victorian engineering. The line was built by The Midland Railway Company. Construction began in 1869 and the railway opened in 1876 first of all for freight trains, then in 1876 for passengers. We travelled on this railway on a Saturday morning when all the other passengers seemed to be going to Leeds to party the weekend away. I have never seen so much alcohol being consumed at that time in the morning. The girls opposite us were downing shots like there was no tomorrow; the very loud and obnoxious guys opposite us were drinking lager combined with a bottle of vodka. Our journey back on the Sunday was thankfully a lot more sedate. The Carlisle Settle Railway passes through some of the most spectacular scenery of the Yorkshire Dales. I'd strongly recommend a trip on it if you enjoy beautiful hilly scenery. It is a historic rail line. On the way back from Bradford as we travelled by train across the Yorkshire Dales; we could not help noticing a slight deterioration in the weather. The dales were covered with snow everywhere and we could scarcely see out of the window due to a blizzard.

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

Train across the Yorkshire Dales

Train across the Yorkshire Dales

Train across the Yorkshire Dales

Train across the Yorkshire Dales

Train across the Yorkshire Dales

Train across the Yorkshire Dales

Train across the Yorkshire Dales

Train across the Yorkshire Dales

Posted by irenevt 07:38 Archived in England Comments (2)

Wigan - The Home of the Pie Eaters.

Statue at Wigan Pier. - Wigan

Statue at Wigan Pier. - Wigan

Wigan - Northern Town.

We had not intended to go to Wigan, but unforeseen circumstances resulted in us spending two nights there. I had passed through Wigan many times by train and even occasionally changed trains there. I did not feel any excitement about the prospect of visiting, but I was glad to be proved wrong. Wigan turned out to have a long history, interesting sights and friendly people. I liked it and would happily stay there again.

We arrived in Wigan in the evening and did not do a great deal other than have dinner in The Moon Under Water - the local Wetherspoons. This pub takes its name from a written description by George Orwell of what his perfect pub would be like. As with most Wetherspoons, there were lots of pictures on the wall relating to local history. This provided me with clues about what there was to see. Next day Peter went to the football and I went to the George Formby statue, Wigan Pier, the Church of All Saints, Wigan Library/Museum, Mab's Cross, the market, the Wigan head. It poured down all day and I had a bout of fever during our stay, but none of the above wrecked our stay. I still enjoyed it.

Wigan is a town in Greater Manchester situated on the River Douglas. Wigan has a population of around 97,000. Wigan was an industrial town specialising in porcelain, clock making and coal mining. A new fact I learned about Wigan during our visit was: Wiganers are referred to as "pie-eaters".This dates back to the 1926 General Strike, when Wigan miners were starved back to work before their counterparts in surrounding towns and so were forced to metaphorically eat "humble pie".

Wigan Pier.

Like most people, I have heard of Wigan Pier due to the famous George Orwell book 'The Road to Wigan Pier'. He wrote this in 1937. I knew the pier was a joke thus thought it did not exist. I was surprised to learn it did. Wigan Pier is the area around the canal at the Wigan flight of locks on the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. The bit referred to as the pier was a coal loading staithe where wagons from a nearby colliery used to be unloaded onto barges. It no longer exists having been demolished in 1929. The joke that Wigan has a pier came from the following incident. In 1891, an excursion train to Southport got delayed. Someone asked: "Where the bloody hell are we?" and the answer from a local wit was 'Wigan Pier.' George Formby Sr. continued the joke in the music halls in Wigan. I liked this area, though it was a little lonely to walk on my own. I walked along the edges of the canal viewing old warehouses, statues and locks. Nearby was Trecherfield Mill. I did not visit the mill, but apparently it is worth visiting and has one of the largest still functioning steam engines in Britain. Trencherfield Mill steam engine is open every Sunday. Tours take place at 11am and 1pm.

The canal in Wigan. - Wigan

The canal in Wigan. - Wigan

Statue at Wigan Pier. - Wigan

Statue at Wigan Pier. - Wigan

Wigan Pier - Wigan

Wigan Pier - Wigan

Wigan Pier - Wigan

Wigan Pier - Wigan

Wigan Pier - Wigan

Wigan Pier - Wigan

Wigan Pier - Wigan

Wigan Pier - Wigan

Trencherfield Mill. - Wigan

Trencherfield Mill. - Wigan

George Formby statue.

George Formby is one of Wigan's native sons. There is a statue of him playing his famous ukelele in the Grand Arcade Shopping Centre. We took a look at it before Peter went off to his match. George Formby was an English actor, singer songwriter and comedian. He was born in Wigan in 1904. He started out in music halls, then became a major film star by the late 1930s and 1940s. He died in 1961.

large_7686231-George_Formby_statue_Wigan.jpg

The Church of All Saints.

After visiting Wigan Pier I walked to The Church of All Saints in Wallgate just off the main street. This is a beautiful building with a tall war memorial outside it. The Church of All Saints is an Anglican parish church. The oldest parts of the church date from the thirteenth century. The church has magnificent stain glass windows. Monuments in the church include effigies of Sir William de Bradshaigh and his wife, Mabel. They are well known local figures who once lived in Wigan's grand manor house in Haigh. There is a local legend about them which I will explain in my Mab's Cross tip. The war memorial outside the church dates from 1925 and was designed by Giles Gilbert Scott. It records the names of those who fell in both world wars. A very helpful man pointed out many of the church's interesting features and told me about its history. This church is definitely worth visiting.

The Church of All Saints - Wigan

The Church of All Saints - Wigan

The Church of All Saints - Wigan

The Church of All Saints - Wigan

The Church of All Saints - Wigan

The Church of All Saints - Wigan

The Church of All Saints - Wigan

The Church of All Saints - Wigan

The Church of All Saints - Wigan

The Church of All Saints - Wigan

The Museum of Wigan Life.

I am not hugely fond of museums but I visited The Museum of Wigan Life for two reasons: one to see the building itself, and two to get out of the non-stop pouring rain. The Museum of Wigan Life is located on Library Street. The building housing the museum was Wigan's first public library and its first building with electric light. It was designed by Alfred Waterhouse and opened in 1878. In 1936 George Orwell researched his book 'The Road to Wigan Pier' in the Reference Library upstairs in this building. This is still a Reference Library nowadays and is well worth a look. The downstairs part of the building deals with various aspects of Wigan life. Among other things it had sections on clock making, rugby, football, coal mining, pies. The museum is free entry. It has clean toilets and a gift shop. I bought some Uncle Joe's mints from here. Apparently they are a famous Wigan mint. Opening times Monday: 10am - 5pm, Tuesday: 10am 5pm, Wednesday: Closed, Thursday: 10am 5pm, Friday: 10am 5pm, Saturday: 11am 3pm, Sunday: Closed.

The Museum of Wigan Life. - Wigan

The Museum of Wigan Life. - Wigan

The Museum of Wigan Life - Wigan

The Museum of Wigan Life - Wigan

The Museum of Wigan Life -Wigan

The Museum of Wigan Life -Wigan

The Museum of Wigan Life - Wigan

The Museum of Wigan Life - Wigan

The Reference Library. - Wigan

The Reference Library. - Wigan

Mab's Cross.

I went looking for Mab's Cross because I kept reading or hearing about it everywhere I went in Wigan. I first came across it reading information in The Moon Under Water Pub, then in the Church of All Saints I saw the effigy of Lady Mabel from the legend. Then in The Museum of Wigan Life I came across it again. The site itself is not particularly impressive. In fact I initially walked past it without seeing it even though I was looking for it. Mab's Cross is a stone cross dating from the thirteenth century. It was one of four stone crosses which were used as way- markers on the medieval route from Wigan to Chorley. At one time it was located on the opposite side of the road from its present position. The cross is not much to look at, but has an interesting legend attached to it. The cross is named after Lady Mabel Bradshaw. Her husband, Sir William Bradshaw, failed to return from the crusades and she then married a Welsh knight. When Bradshaw unexpectedly returned after a ten year absence, he murdered his wife's new husband in Newton le Willows. Lady Mabel did penance for her bigamy by walking from Haigh Hall to a stone cross in Wigan "bare footed and bare legged" once a week for as long as she lived. Although the legend is not true, Sir William Bradshaw and his wife Mabel were real people. They lived in the manor house that is now the site of Haigh Hall. I would have liked to go and see Haigh Hall even though it is now a hotel, but after getting repeatedly soaked, I had to retreat to bed unwell for a few hours to recover.

Mab's Cross. - Wigan

Mab's Cross. - Wigan

Mab's Cross. - Wigan

Mab's Cross. - Wigan

The Face of Wigan.

The Face of Wigan is a large sculpture of a face located outside Wigan's civic centre. It was sculpted by Nick Kirby and paid for by Modus, the owners of the Grand Arcade. It is worth having a look at and is quite colourful.

The Wigan Face. - Wigan

The Wigan Face. - Wigan

The Wigan Face. - Wigan

The Wigan Face. - Wigan

The Mercure Wigan Oak Hotel.

We stayed here for two nights in August 2016. The hotel was about ten minutes walk from the Wigan North Western train station. Check in was fine. The room was clean and comfortable. It had tea/coffee making facilities and a safe, but no fridge. It was quiet at night. We had free wifi which worked fine. We ate in the hotel restaurant on our second night. Food was ok, but not great. Service was a bit slow and there were a lot of complaints. We did not complain, but we were given all our drinks free because of the slow service which was rather nice. At check out they tried to charge us for breakfasts we had not had. They removed them straight away when we complained but we were very clear that we did not want breakfast when we checked in so the mistake should not have been made. The location of the hotel is convenient for Wigan town centre, sights, bars, restaurants and shops. I would stay here again. Address: River Way, Wigan, Lancashire WN1.

A_meal_in_the_hotel_restaurant

A_meal_in_the_hotel_restaurant

The Moon Under Water.

The Moon Under Water is a Wetherspoon's pub so has cheap food and drink. We had fish and chips washed down with cider. There were displays on the walls about local history which helped me plan my next day's sightseeing. Good food and friendly service. Not too noisy for a Friday night. I've noticed lots of pubs called The Moon Under Water here's why : "The Moon Under Water" is a 1946 essay by George Orwell, in which he provided a detailed description of his ideal public house, which he named The Moon Under Water. Some of the features Orwell wanted were: The architecture and fittings must be Victorian. Games, such as darts, are only played in the public bar. The pub is quiet enough to talk in. The barmaids know the customers by name and take an interest in everyone. It sells tobacco and cigarettes, aspirins and stamps. It sells cheap, good quality food. It has a garden. Address: 57a Market Place, Wigan.

The Moon Under Water

The Moon Under Water

The Moon Under Water

The Moon Under Water

Wigan Market.

Wigan has rather an attractive market place plus lots of large shopping centres such as the Grand Arcade and the Galleries. Some of the shopping centres have their entrances in Tudor style buildings on the main street. There is a large Marks and Spencers in the Grand Arcade. Apparently Marks and Spencers originated in Wigan. Most well known high street stores can be found in the shopping arcades in Wigan. My visit to the market was in pouring rain, but I stopped off in the covered part and bought a pie for lunch.

Entrance to the galleries. - Wigan

Entrance to the galleries. - Wigan

Tudor style buildings on main street house shops. - Wigan

Tudor style buildings on main street house shops. - Wigan

Royal Arcade, Wigan. - Wigan

Royal Arcade, Wigan. - Wigan

Wigan market place. - Wigan

Wigan market place. - Wigan

Posted by irenevt 05:38 Archived in England Comments (0)

Lancaster - The Hanging Town.

Peter outside Lancaster Castle. - Lancaster

Peter outside Lancaster Castle. - Lancaster

Lovely Lancaster.

We have visited Lancaster four times. Our first visit was a day trip several years ago when we took our time and had a really good look around. This included touring the castle. Our second visit in August 2015, was a very rushed visit when we arrived here on route to Walsall and stopped off for around an hour between trains. During this visit we walked to the castle, priory, judge's house and the market. Our third visit in March 2016 was for three hours on our way to Crewe where we stayed overnight. We had a good look at the town on this visit including the town hall, Saint Peter's Cathedral and the River Lune, but unfortunately the weather was pretty awful on this visit. Our fourth visit was in August 2016. The weather was kinder this time sunny, but very windy. We walked to the Roman baths, then along the River Lune, through the centre of town, then all the way to the Ashton Memorial in Williamson Park.

Typical Lancaster street. - Lancaster

Typical Lancaster street. - Lancaster

Lancaster is located in Lancashire, England. It is situated on the River Lune. It has a population of nearly 46,000. Lancaster is a lovely, historical city. The House of Lancaster was a branch of the English royal family which fought in the War of the Roses. The traditional emblem for the House of Lancaster is a red rose. In the War of the Roses it fought against the house of York whose emblem is a white rose. Lancaster has a very long history. The Ancient Romans established a fort on the hill where Lancaster Castle now stands at the end of the first century AD. Nearby there are still the remains of some Roman baths. Later Lancaster fell under the control of William the Conquerer according to the Domesday Book of 1086. Later still, in 1193, Lancaster became a borough under King Richard I. Lancaster was granted city status in 1937. Lancaster is also home to Lancaster University.

Lancaster Castle.

On our recent short visit we just looked at the outside of the castle, but on our first visit we paid to go in. I remember that at that time the castle was still being used as a prison. It was a prison until 2011. At one point on our castle tour we were put into an old prison cell then the door was locked behind us. The darkness inside was total, not a single ray of light could penetrate the cell. Lancaster Castle was once the castle of John O' Gaunt. The castle has witnessed among other things the trials of the Pendle Witches, the trials of the Lancaster Martyrs and around 200 executions. At one point executions were so common here that Lancaster was known as the hanging town.

Lancaster Castle

Lancaster Castle

Lancaster Castle

Lancaster Castle

Lancaster Castle

Lancaster Castle

Lancaster Castle

Lancaster Castle

Lancaster Castle

Lancaster Castle

Lancaster Priory.

Lancaster Priory is right next to Lancaster Castle. The present day priory is probably located on the site of an Ancient Roman building. In the sixth century a Saxon church is thought to have stood here. Then in 1094 Roger de Poitou established a Benedictine priory dedicated to St Mary here. In 1539 this Catholic priory was abolished by Henry VIII and the following year it became a parish church. I'm not sure if we visited the inside of the priory on our first visit. Unfortunately we did not have time to do so on our more recent visit.

Lancaster Priory

Lancaster Priory

Lancaster Priory

Lancaster Priory

Lancaster Priory

Lancaster Priory

Lancaster Priory

Lancaster Priory

The Judge's Lodgings.

The Judge's Lodgings is close to the castle and the priory. It is a Grade I listed building and is believed to be the oldest town house in Lancaster. The house was once owned by Thomas Covell, Keeper of Lancaster Castle. He was a notorious witch hunter. Between 1776 and 1975 the house became a residence for judges visiting the Assize Court at Lancaster Castle. Nowadays it is a museum.

The Judge's Lodgings

The Judge's Lodgings

The Judge's Lodgings

The Judge's Lodgings

The Market.

On the day we visited, Lancaster's town centre was home to a busy market. There were lots of wonderful food stalls at this market. I wanted to buy everything. There was homemade bread, cheeses, pickles, cakes. We bought pork pie and pork pie with stilton from the very friendly man at the pie stall. He explained to us the origins of the whist pies he was selling. His pork pies were delicious. There were also fruit and vegetable stalls, fast food stalls and pottery stalls. There was a museum next to the market.

The Market

The Market

The Market

The Market

Lancaster Town Hall.

Lancaster has quite an attractive town hall building which is located in Dalton Square. This Town Hall building was officially opened on the 27th December 1909, by Lord Ashton. It replaced the existing Town Hall which was located in Market Square and which is now the city museum. To the side of the Town Hall is Lancaster's War Memorial and gardens. The memorial was designed by Thomas Mawson and Sons. It commemorates the dead of the two world wars. Ten bronze panels at the back of the monument record the names of 1,010 Lancastrians who died in the First World War. The plinth in front of the memorial lists the names of a further 300 who died in World War II. Opposite the town hall is Dalton Square Gardens with its statue of Queen Victoria.The Victoria Monument was given to Lancaster by Lord Ashton in 1907. It was created by sculptor Herbert Hampton. Queen Victoria and the four lions on the monument are made of bronze. The panels around the bottom of the monument show various eminent Victorians, including Lancaster born biologist, Richard Owen.

Lancaster Town Hall.

Lancaster Town Hall.

Lancaster Town Hall.

Lancaster Town Hall.

Lancaster Town Hall.

Lancaster Town Hall.

Lancaster Town Hall.

Lancaster Town Hall.

Lancaster Town Hall.

Lancaster Town Hall.

Saint Peter's Cathedral.

Lancaster Cathedral, also known as Saint Peter's Cathedral, is not far from Lancaster's Town Hall. Originally the cathedral was known as St Peter’s Church a Catholic church which was consecrated on the 4th of October 1859. In 1924 it became the Cathedral Church of the new Diocese of Lancaster. The cathedral is a very attractive building from the outside. Unfortunately, as it was closed during our visit, we could not see inside.

Saint Peter's Cathedral.

Saint Peter's Cathedral.

Saint Peter's Cathedral.

Saint Peter's Cathedral.

Public drinking fountain.

There is quite an attractive old public drinking fountain at the entrance to Moor Lane. This fountain was originally in Dalton Square. It was erected in memory of Thomas Johnson, who was a local solicitor. The drinking fountain was moved to its present location when the new Town Hall was built in 1909.

Public drinking fountain

Public drinking fountain

Public drinking fountain

Public drinking fountain

The Penny Almshouses.

On our walk through Lancaster we passed The Penny Almshouses. These were set up using a £700 endowment left by William Penny, who was once the Mayor of Lancaster.They were built in 1720 to house twelve poor men. There was a small chapel here in addition to the almshouses.

The Penny Almshouses

The Penny Almshouses

The Penny Almshouses

The Penny Almshouses

The Lune Millennium Bridge.

Despite the heavy rain, we walked to the River Lune and had a look at The Lune Millennium Bridge, a cable-stayed footbridge which spans the River Lune. This bridge was designed by Whitby Bird and Partners. It cost £1.8 million to build and commemorates the year 2000.

The Lune Millennium Bridge.

The Lune Millennium Bridge.

The Lune Millennium Bridge.

The Lune Millennium Bridge.

The Lune Millennium Bridge.

The Lune Millennium Bridge.

Lancaster City Museum.

We did not have time to visit Lancaster City Museum, which is situated in Market Square. It occupies a building which was once Lancaster's Town Hall. It was built in 1783 and designed by Major Thomas Jarratt. The cupola and top were designed by Thomas Harrison. This building has been a museum since 1977. It has displays on local history and the Museum of the King's Own Royal Regiment.

Lancaster City Museum

Lancaster City Museum

Lancaster City Museum

Lancaster City Museum

The Roman Baths.

I have seen the signpost for the Roman Baths before but this visit was the first one when we actually went to look for them. The Roman baths date from the time when the area on Castle Hill where Lancaster Castle stands was the site of a Roman fort. They were probably built in the second century during the reign of Trajan or Hadrian. The Roman Baths are located on Vicarage Hill. To reach them from the station, pass the castle and priory then walk onto the hill. They are signposted off to the right hand side. The remains are enclosed by a fence. Part of the underfloor heating system is still visible.

The Roman Baths. - Lancaster

The Roman Baths. - Lancaster

The Roman Baths. - Lancaster

The Roman Baths. - Lancaster

The Ashton Memorial.

We walked all the way to the Ashton Memorial in Williamson Park. This memorial can be seen from all over Lancaster, but getting to it involves an uphill walk. The Ashton Memorial is a folly which was built between 1907 and 1909 by millionaire industrialist Lord Ashton in memory of his second wife, Jessy. The memorial is around 150 feet tall. Nowadays, the memorial is used as an exhibition space and a venue for concerts and weddings. Williamson Park is a lovely park with ponds, statues, a butterfly house and views.

The Ashton Memorial - Lancaster

The Ashton Memorial - Lancaster

The Ashton Memorial - Lancaster

The Ashton Memorial - Lancaster

The Ashton Memorial - Lancaster

The Ashton Memorial - Lancaster

View from Williamson Park. - Lancaster

View from Williamson Park. - Lancaster

Williamson Park. - Lancaster

Williamson Park. - Lancaster

The Lancashire Woollen Industry.

Following the industrial revolution, Lancashire became a successsful centre for the cotton mill industry. One of the reason's for its success in this industry was that its workforce were already skilled in spinning and weaving wool and were able to transfer their skills to a new medium. I rather liked these sheep and sheep dog images I saw on the side of a Lancaster building.

The Lancashire Woollen Industry.

The Lancashire Woollen Industry.

The Lancashire Woollen Industry.

The Lancashire Woollen Industry.

The Lancashire Woollen Industry.

The Lancashire Woollen Industry.

The Lancashire Woollen Industry.

The Lancashire Woollen Industry.

The Red Rose.

Lancaster is situated in Lancashire. The symbol of Lancashire is a red rose. This rose was first adopted as a heraldic device by the first Earl of Lancaster. The Red Rose of Lancaster was the House of Lancaster's badge during the Wars of the Roses. In this war the House of Lancaster fought against the House of York whose badge was a white rose. When Henry Tudor, later Henry VII, married Elizabeth of York in January 1486, he combined the two roses to create the Tudor rose.

The Red Rose.

The Red Rose.

Ye Olde John O'Gaunt Pub: Good place for a pint.

We decided to escape the rain by visiting the John O'Gaunt Pub on Market Street. It looks old outside, but has been modernised inside. We tried the Lancaster Blonde beer and it was excellent. The pub is long and narrow and was pretty busy when we visited. The bar staff served me straight away despite the crowds and were very friendly and efficient. The pub's decor was quite interesting with lots of stuff on the walls.

Good place for a pint.

Good place for a pint.

Good place for a pint.

Good place for a pint.

Good place for a pint.

Good place for a pint.

Golden Lion Pub: A pint with some history.

On our walk to Williamson Park we passed the Golden Lion pub. We did not go inside but noticed some plaques on the outside of the pub saying that this pub was where condemned prisoners were brought for one last drink before they were executed. This included the unfortunate ladies condemned as the Lancashire Witches. The plaques also told of a tee-totaller who refused a drink and was thus executed just before his reprieve arrived. I've always said not drinking can kill you!!

Golden Lion Pub. - Lancaster

Golden Lion Pub. - Lancaster

Golden Lion Pub. - Lancaster

Golden Lion Pub. - Lancaster

Merchants 1688: Merchants 1688.

Merchants 1688 is a restaurant and pub located very close to Lancaster Castle and Lancaster train station. The restaurant is located inside a 300 year old former wine cellar. There is indoor and outdoor seating. We had some excellent cider and a ploughman's lunch here and both were very enjoyable.

Merchants 1688. - Lancaster

Merchants 1688. - Lancaster

Merchants 1688. - Lancaster

Merchants 1688. - Lancaster

Lancaster Train Station.

I may have only stopped off in Lancaster three times, but I have certainly passed through it much more than this. Lancaster is on one of the main north south train lines. When we travel up to Glasgow from England we always pass through here.

Lancaster Train Station

Lancaster Train Station

Posted by irenevt 03:03 Archived in England Comments (0)

Carlisle - Border Town.

April 2014.

Friendly local. - Carlisle

Friendly local. - Carlisle

Carlisle - Border Town.

Carlisle is a place I have been through countless times, but until our most recent visit I had never actually stopped and looked at it. Well, my husband was around in the UK at the time when his football team, Walsall, were playing Carlisle (It all ended in a 1- 1 draw) so he was off to the match and I tagged along for some sightseeing. To my pleasant surprise Carlisle turned out to be a lovely town complete with castle, cathedral, market, art gallery, town walls, parks, rivers and pleasant pubs. Who could ask for more? Carlisle being so close to the Scottish/ English border has had a turbulent history and has I believe belonged to both countries at one time or other. It is also close to Hadrian's Wall built by the Romans to keep out the unruly Scots ....... but I managed to get through anyway. Carlisle was occupied by the Jacobites when Bonnie Prince Charlie tried to seize the throne and when he failed many of his followers ended up incarcerated in Carlisle Castle.This castle was also one of the many prisons Mary Queen of Scots was forced to languish in. On the day of our visit the sun was shining, the town's market was in full swing and the atmosphere of the place was just generally very, very pleasant. Now we know how lovely it is we will be back.

The Citadel.

Right next to the railway station in Carlisle there are two old drum towers, which are known as the citadel of Carlisle. Pass through these to enter the old town of Carlisle. The drum towers were built in 1541 by Henry VIII. Their role was to strengthen the southern approach to the city and shield it from attack. At one time these towers were the home of Carlisle's court and gaol. The west tower was the place for criminal trials and the east tower was used for civil trials.

Carlisle Citadel. - Carlisle

Carlisle Citadel. - Carlisle

Carlisle town hall and main square.

Carlisle's old town hall building is now the tourist information office. In front of it there was an excellent market during our visit which sold lots of different foods and drinks including Polish bigosh, German sausages and American burgers. Also located in front of it is Carlisle's lion topped market cross which dates from 1682.

The market. - Carlisle

The market. - Carlisle

The market. - Carlisle

The market. - Carlisle

Market Cross. - Carlisle

Market Cross. - Carlisle

Carlisle old town hall. - Carlisle

Carlisle old town hall. - Carlisle

The Guildhall.

Carlisle's guildhall is close to the old town hall and the market cross. It is housed in an attractive black and white building which is now the guildhall museum. This building was once home to Carlisle's ancient trade guilds. The guildhall dates from the late 14th century. It was originally built as a private house for local citizen Richard of Redness. When he died, Richard left the house to the city and it became a meeting point for several guilds such as: the butchers, merchants, shoemakers, glovers, smiths, tailors, tanners and weavers. The guildhall museum houses among other things the huge ironclad chest that once stored the city's documents and Carlisle's medieval stocks. Admission is free.

The guildhall. - Carlisle

The guildhall. - Carlisle

Carlisle Cathedral.

Carlisle Cathedral is not only a beautiful building in its own right, but is also surrounded by several other lovely old buildings. The cathedral dates originally from 1122, though it has been rebuilt several times. In 1292, for example, it was rebuilt after a devastating fire. The cathedral's ceiling is very beautiful like looking at a starry night sky. There are also several interesting tombs, painted wall panels, lovely stain glass windows and a treasury. Entry to the cathedral is free but there are requests for donations for the upkeep of this lovely building. My favourite part of the cathedral interior was the lovely ceiling with its blue skies and many suns. Nearby on the outside you can see a miniature model of the cathedral. St Cuthbert's Church is located nearby, too.

Carlisle Cathedral - Carlisle

Carlisle Cathedral - Carlisle

Carlisle Cathedral. - Carlisle

Carlisle Cathedral. - Carlisle

Cathedral gargoyle. - Carlisle

Cathedral gargoyle. - Carlisle

Cathedral ceiling. - Carlisle

Cathedral ceiling. - Carlisle

Cathedral interior. - Carlisle

Cathedral interior. - Carlisle

Stained glass window. - Carlisle

Stained glass window. - Carlisle

Bust of Christ. - Carlisle

Bust of Christ. - Carlisle

Daffodils by the cathedral. - Carlisle

Daffodils by the cathedral. - Carlisle

Cathedral in miniature. - Carlisle

Cathedral in miniature. - Carlisle

Looking towards the cathedral from the castle. - Carlisle

Looking towards the cathedral from the castle. - Carlisle

Beautiful Carlisle bluebells - Carlisle

Beautiful Carlisle bluebells - Carlisle

Tullie House.

Between the cathedral and the castle lies Tullie House. This seventeenth century townhouse now houses Carlisle's Museum and Art Gallery. I did not go into the museum but I did treat myself to a cappuccino in the restaurant and enjoy the house's beautiful, colourful gardens. There's a Jacobean garden and a Roman garden all filled with beautiful plants. The front of the house had some very ornate drain pipes, too. Children were enjoying a spot of pond dipping in the gardens during our visit.

Gardens at Tullie House. - Carlisle

Gardens at Tullie House. - Carlisle

Gardens at Tullie House. - Carlisle

Gardens at Tullie House. - Carlisle

Roman garden. - Carlisle

Roman garden. - Carlisle

The Jacobean Garden. - Carlisle

The Jacobean Garden. - Carlisle

Carlisle Castle.

If you are arriving into Carlisle by train pick up a leaflet for two for the price of one entry to sites for rail travellers, fill in the voucher at the back and you can get into the castle cheaper. Carlisle Castle is one of, if not the, most besieged castles in Britain due to its location on the Scottish/English border. In Roman times there was a fort on this site. The earliest castle here was built by King William Rufus in 1092. That castle was made of wood. The castle was later rebuilt in stone by Henry 1. The oldest surviving part of the castle is the keep which dates from the twelfth century. Inside the keep etched into some of the stone walls you can see beautiful carvings drawn by unfortunate captives who were imprisoned here by the future Richard lll in 1480. One famous captive at the castle was Mary Queen of Scots who was imprisoned here when she fled Scotland in 1568: Carlisle Castle was captured by the Jacobites during the Jacobite uprising that aimed to put Bonnie Prince Charlie on the throne. When the Duke of Cumberland regained control of the castle, many Jacobites were imprisoned here. They were kept in cramped conditions in pitch black rooms and were forced to lick the walls of the castle to stop themselves dying of thirst. Those that survived that ordeal were executed. The castle was also once home to the Borders Regiment and houses their museum. Entry to the castle is £5.90 for adults.

Carlisle Castle - Carlisle

Carlisle Castle - Carlisle

Ornate drainpipe. - Carlisle

Ornate drainpipe. - Carlisle

The king and queen! - Carlisle

The king and queen! - Carlisle

Carlise Castle - Carlisle

Carlise Castle - Carlisle

Carlisle Castle - Carlisle

Carlisle Castle - Carlisle

Carlisle Castle. - Carlisle

Carlisle Castle. - Carlisle

Bitts Park.

Bitts park is just behind the castle. It is bordered at the northern end by the River Eden. As it was a hot day during our visit, the park was full of people enjoying the sunshine. Bitts Park has a large and popular children's play area. It also had a small maze and an interesting musical garden, where people can create their own music by hitting the musical sculptures. The park also contains a statue of Queen Victoria and during our visit lots of wonderful spring flowers.

Bitts Park. - Carlisle

Bitts Park. - Carlisle

Bitts Park. - Carlisle

Bitts Park. - Carlisle

Musical sculpture. - Carlisle

Musical sculpture. - Carlisle

The River Eden - Carlisle

The River Eden - Carlisle

The River Eden. - Carlisle

The River Eden. - Carlisle

Carlisle Train Station.

I really liked Carlisle when we visited last Easter. This time I was just passing through and was only in the station for a short time after leaving the train from Glasgow and before boarding a train that would travel on the Carlisle Settle line. Most British stations are not very nice, but at Carlisle station they really have made an effort to create a pleasant environment. The station was clean, the free toilets were clean and much more modern than many station toilets. There was an indoor area which had been made to look like an outdoor grassy area, floral displays and pictures of old steam trains on the walls. It all help created a pleasant place in which to wait for a train.

Carlisle Train Station

Carlisle Train Station

Carlisle Train Station

Carlisle Train Station

Carlisle Train Station

Carlisle Train Station

Carlisle Train Station

Carlisle Train Station

The Carlisle Settle Railway.

This historical line was the last major stretch of railway built in the UK. It dates from Victorian times and crosses some absolutely beautiful scenery. Several historical station buildings still exist on the line, too.

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway

The Carlisle Settle Railway - Scenery

The Carlisle Settle Railway - Scenery

The Carlisle Settle Railway - Scenery

The Carlisle Settle Railway - Scenery

The Carlisle Settle Railway - Scenery

The Carlisle Settle Railway - Scenery

Posted by irenevt 02:28 Archived in England Comments (0)

Wonderful Wales.

Conwy Castle - Wales

Conwy Castle - Wales

Wonderful Wales.

I have been to Wales many times. My first ever visit was to Bangor and Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch, the station with the longest name, situated on the Isle of Anglesey. I have also been to Llandudno, Conwy, Swansea and Cardiff. Wales is located in the south west of the United Kingdom. It has a land border with England on its east side and the rest of the country is surrounded by the the Irish Sea and the Bristol Channel. Wales is a beautiful country with many mountains, national parks and a long rugged coastline. It has a population of about three million. Wales is famous for coal mining though this industry has largely ceased to exist. There is a very well known book set in a Welsh coal mining community 'How Green was my Valley' by Richard Llewellyn. It was written in 1939 and made into a film directed by John Ford in 1941. Wales is also famous for singing and is home to several choirs. The sport most closely associated with Wales is rugby union. People in Wales speak English, but Wales also has its own language - Welsh which is spoken mainly in the north of the country. Wales has several symbols. One is a red dragon. This appears on the Welsh flag. The oldest known use of the dragon to symbolise Wales is recorded in the Historia Brittonum, which was written around AD 829. The red dragon is popularly believed to have been the battle standard of King Arthur and other ancient Celtic leaders. Other symbols of Wales are the daffodil - its national flower and the leek which belongs to the same family. According to legend, Saint David, the patron saint of Wales, ordered his soldiers to make themselves known to him by wearing a leek on their helmets in an ancient battle against the Saxons.

Llandudno.

We used to go to Llandudno frequently as we had friends living in Wales and this was a convenient place to meet up. Llandudno is Wales's largest resort. It is a traditional British seaside resort with many of its buildings dating from Victorian and Edwardian times. The town is located between two mountains: the Great Orme and the Little Orme. Llandudno has a lovely long sandy beach. Be careful of tides though. In 1902 a cable car began operating from Llandudno to the top of the Great Orme. There are great views from up there. Llandudno has lots of good restaurants, hotels and shops.

With mother-in-law and friends. - Wales

With mother-in-law and friends. - Wales

View from the cable car. - Wales

View from the cable car. - Wales

The Great Orme - Wales

The Great Orme - Wales

Llandudno - Wales

Llandudno - Wales

The beach - Wales

The beach - Wales

Cardiff.

I have been to Cardiff twice. Both trips were football related. I had a quick look at the city while hubbie and his brother went to the football. Cardiff is the capital of Wales. It is a pleasant city with lots of restaurants and shops. It is located on the River Taff. Welsh people are sometimes called Taffies due to this river's name. I had a stroll around town and through Bute Park which is next to Cardiff Castle.

Cardiff Castle from Bute Park. - Wales

Cardiff Castle from Bute Park. - Wales

Swansea.

We travelled to Swansea for a football match. This trip I actually attended the match which is unlike me. Walsall lost, so I have not been allowed to attend any more matches since. I am clearly an ill omen. We stayed overnight in a pub that also provided accommodation. I remember it as quite a friendly place. We had a look around the marina area and explored Swansea at night and like all British cities on a Saturday night it was filled with crowds of people looking for a good time. We had a pleasant meal in a local pub. Swansea was very good for shopping. Swansea is Wales's second largest city. It is situated on the South West Wales coast. It used to be famous for the copper industry.

Swansea - Wales

Swansea - Wales

Conwy.

We visited Conwy with friends. We spent most of our time in its lovely castle and going for a stroll along the front. Conwy Castle was built for Edward I, by Master James of St George. The castle has two fortified gateways, eight massive towers and a great hall. It is well worth a visit.

Conwy - Wales

Conwy - Wales

Conwy - Wales

Conwy - Wales

Conwy - Wales

Conwy - Wales

The Daffodil.

The daffodil, my favourite flower, is the national flower of Wales. It belongs to the same family of plants as the leek another symbol of Wales According to legend, Saint David, the patron saint of Wales, ordered his soldiers to wear a leek on their helmets in an ancient battle against the Saxons so he could identify them easily. Daffodils and leeks are worn on St David's Day the first of March.

Spring Flowers

Spring Flowers

Posted by irenevt 01:34 Archived in Wales Comments (0)

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