A Travellerspoint blog

Stunning Stirling - Home of the Howling Wolf.

Highland cattle. - Stirling

Highland cattle. - Stirling

"Stunning Stirling."

I have been visiting Stirling now and then since I was a child and have visited frequently as an adult since some of my closest friends live there. On a typical visit we would meet up with our friends, eat out and chat about our lives. We would not usually do a great deal of touristy stuff, but this summer we stayed there for several days and visited or revisited many of the tourist sights, so I now feel prepared for doing a touristy page on it.

At the heart of Stirling stands its magnificent castle, proudly perched on Castle Hill. The old town of Stirling with its many interesting historical buildings surrounds this. The River Forth runs through the centre of Stirling. The historical symbol of Stirling is the wolf. This is due to a legend that when Stirling was under attack from Viking invaders long ago, a wolf howled, alerting the townspeople in time to save the town. Stirling was made a Royal burgh by King David I in 1130. Several very famous and important battles took place here during the Wars of Scottish Independence, such as: The Battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297 and The Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. Stirling is located in Central Scotland at the foot of the Ochil Hills. It is sometimes considered as the Gateway to the Highlands. Historically it was the site of the nearest crossing of the Forth to its river mouth. Stirling is home to Stirling University.

Below are some of Stirling's main sights:

Stirling Castle.

Stirling Castle sits at the top of Castle Hill and dominates the town of Stirling. I have visited the interior of the castle long ago but not recently. Stirling Castle is surrounded on three sides by steep cliffs so it has a strong defensive position. The first record of Stirling Castle dates from about 1110, when King Alexander I dedicated a chapel here. His successor David I, went on to make Stirling a royal burgh. Most of the castle's important buildings, such as the palace and great hall, date from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Several Scottish Kings and Queens have been crowned at Stirling, including Mary, Queen of Scots, in 1542. Her son, King James, was crowned in the nearby Church of the Holy Rude, and grew up within the castle walls. The castle has been controlled by the English and the Scots and has withstood at least eight sieges. The last being in 1746, when Bonnie Prince Charlie unsuccessfully tried to capture it. Stirling Castle was used as a prison during the seventeenth century. From 1800 until 1964, the Castle was owned by the War Office and run as a barracks and recruiting depot for the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. As with any castle worth its salt, Stirling Castle is haunted. The Green Lady, the ghost of one of Mary Queen of Scots' servants wanders the castle grounds at night.

Stirling Castle perched on its hill. - Stirling

Stirling Castle perched on its hill. - Stirling

Stirling Castle. - Stirling

Stirling Castle. - Stirling

Stirling Castle. - Stirling

Stirling Castle. - Stirling

Robert the Bruce statue outside the castle. - Stirling

Robert the Bruce statue outside the castle. - Stirling

Stirling Castle. - Stirling

Stirling Castle. - Stirling

View towards Wallace Monument from castle. - Stirling

View towards Wallace Monument from castle. - Stirling

The Wallace Monument viewed from the castle. - Stirling

The Wallace Monument viewed from the castle. - Stirling

Valley Cemetery.

I know it sounds a bit morbid, but Valley Cemetery situated between the castle and the Church of the Holy Rude is one of my favourite places in Stirling. It is a beautiful historic cemetery filled with interesting gravestones and monuments to various historical figures. By the 1850s, the Holy Rude Kirkyard had become too overcrowded and a new burial ground was necessary. The Valley Cemetery was opened in 1857 to meet the burial needs of the growing town. It was set out like a garden with walkways and statues of Presbyterian heroes and heroines to add an improving, educational dimension. The cemetery even has a tomb shaped like a pyramid. This Star Pyramid was dedicated in 1863. Its inscriptions refer to key aspects of the development of the Presbyterian Church in Scotland. The pyramid was financed by William Drummond who also paid for the Presbyterian statues in the cemetery. He is interred next to the pyramid. The rugged rock to the south of the cemetery is The Ladies' Rock. This was a vantage point for the ladies of the court to watch Royal Tournaments. There are great views from here.

The Martyrs' Monument.

The Martyrs' Monument is located in the Valley Cemetery. I photographed it when we visited, but knew nothing about it. Now I have located its history. This monument was paid for by William Drummond, a rich and zealous Presbyterian. He was responsible for many monuments in the Valley Cemetery which commemorate the Presbyterian cause.

When Charles II was restored to the throne in 1660 his government took actions against the more extreme Presbyterians. By 1680 these Presbyterians considered themselves so persecuted they made a Declaration at Sanquhar that accused Charles II of being the anti Christ. In Wigtown in 1685, two young sisters, Margaret and Agnes Wilson and their friend Margaret McLaughlin were suspected of being Presbyterian extremists and were ordered to take an oath of allegiance to Charles II in front of the local Procurator. They refused and were sentenced to death by drowning. Agnes, who was aged only 15, had her sentence commuted but the two Margarets were tied to stakes in the Solway Firth and drowned by the incoming tide.

Star Pyramid, Valley Cemetery. - Stirling

Star Pyramid, Valley Cemetery. - Stirling

Presbyterian statues - Stirling

Presbyterian statues - Stirling

Valley Cemetery. - Stirling

Valley Cemetery. - Stirling

View from Ladies' Rock. - Stirling

View from Ladies' Rock. - Stirling

The Martyrs'Monument. - Stirling

The Martyrs'Monument. - Stirling

Looking towards Ladies' Rock. - Stirling

Looking towards Ladies' Rock. - Stirling

The Church of the Holy Rude.

Stirling Castle is the oldest bulding in Stirling and The Church of the Holy Rude is the second oldest. It was founded in 1129 during the reign of David I and was initially known as the parish church of Stirling. It later changed its name when Robert II founded an altar to the Holy Rude here. Holy Rude means Holy Cross. The church was largely destroyed by a terrible fire in March 1405 and a new church was built on the site. This was completed around 1414. In 1567 the infant King James VI was crowned here.

The Church of the Holy Rude. - Stirling

The Church of the Holy Rude. - Stirling

The Church of the Holy Rude. - Stirling

The Church of the Holy Rude. - Stirling

The Church of the Holy Rude. - Stirling

The Church of the Holy Rude. - Stirling

The Church of the Holy Rude. - Stirling

The Church of the Holy Rude. - Stirling

The Church of the Holy Rude. - Stirling

The Church of the Holy Rude. - Stirling

Cowane's Hospital.

Cowane's Hospital is opposite the Church of the Holy Rude. It is a seventeenth century almshouse created to care for the elderly. It was established in 1637 with a bequest of 40,000 merks from the estate of the merchant John Cowane. Cowane was descended from a family of Stirling merchants who exported fish, coal and wool to the Dutch. A statue of Cowane on the front of the building known as Auld Staneybreeks, which means old stone trousers, is supposed to come alive at the bells on Hogmany and dance in front of the hospital building. Around 1720 the hospital was converted into a Guildhall. Then in 1832 it became an isolation hospital during a cholera epidemic. About a third of Stirling's population died during this awful time. The hospital building is now used as an arts venue.

Cowane's Hospital. - Stirling

Cowane's Hospital. - Stirling

Mar's Wark.

Mar's Wark, also known as Mar's Lodging, is a ruined building at the top of St John's Street. It backs onto the Valley Cemetery. It was built between 1570 and 1572 by John Erskine, Regent of Scotland and Earl of Mar as a residence for his family. Legend claims that Erskine stole stones from Cambuskenneth Abbey to build his house and was thus cursed by its bishop. Part of the curse states: ' thy Wark shall be the emblem of thy house, and shall teach mankind that he who cruelly and haughtily raiseth himself upon the ruins of the Holy cannot prosper. Thy Wark shall be cursed and shall never be finished...'

Mar's Wark viewed from the cemetery. - Stirling

Mar's Wark viewed from the cemetery. - Stirling

Mar's Wark. - Stirling

Mar's Wark. - Stirling

Mar's Wark. - Stirling

Mar's Wark. - Stirling

Old Town Jail.

This is located on St John's Street. I have not gone in to do the tour, just viewed it from the outside. The Old Town Jail was built in 1847 when the old Tolbooth Jail became too overcrowded. Conditions inside the jail were extremely harsh. The building was used as a military prison until 1935.

Stirling Jail. - Stirling

Stirling Jail. - Stirling

Stirling Jail. - Stirling

Stirling Jail. - Stirling

Rob Roy Statue.

Walking down from the old town, we passed several statues, one of them was a statue of Rob Roy MacGregor. My mother had MacGregor blood and always claimed to be descended from him. Who knows???

Robert Roy MacGregor was a very famous Scottish outlaw, who later became a folk hero, a sort of Scottish Robin Hood. Rob Roy was born around 1671 at Glengyle on Loch Katrine. He married Mary Helen MacGregor of Comar and they had four sons: James, Ranald, Coll and Robert. At the age of eighteen Rob Roy and his father joined the Jacobite rising led by Viscount Dundee, also known as Bonnie Dundee. When the rising failed, Rob Roy's father was imprisoned and the family fell apart. In July 1717 all those who took part in the Jacobite Rising were pardoned, except the Clan Gregor. Rob Roy became a cattleman and borrowed a large sum to increase his herd. He was cheated out of this money by his chief herder and defaulted on his loan. This led to him being branded an outlaw. His family were evicted from their home. James Graham, 1st Duke of Montrose seized Rob Roy's lands, and Rob Roy waged a private blood feud against the him until 1722 when he was imprisoned. He was later pardoned and died in his house at Inverlochlarig Beg, Balquhidder, on the 28th of December 1734. The publication of a novel about his life by Sir Walter Scott in 1817 brought him posthumous fame.

Rob Roy Statue. - Stirling

Rob Roy Statue. - Stirling

Rob Roy Statue. - Stirling

Rob Roy Statue. - Stirling

Robert Burns Statue.

Robert Burns is Scotland's most celebrated poet and there are statues of him in many parts of Scotland and in fact many parts of the world. There is one of him near the Rob Roy statue in Stirling. Burns wrote some unfavourable lines about Stirling when he visited and found several of its historical buildings run down.

'Here Stuarts once in glory reign'd,
And laws for Scotland's weal ordain'd;
But now unroof'd their palace stands,
Their sceptre's sway'd by other hands;
The injured Stuart line is gone,
A race outlandish fills their throne;
An idiot race, to honour lost;
Who know them best despise them most.'

He also wrote Scots Wha Hae in which he imagines Robert the Bruce's address to his soldiers just before the Battle of Bannockburn.

'Scots, wha hae wi Wallace bled,
Scots, wham Bruce has aften led,
Welcome tae yer gory bed,
Or tae victorie.

'Now's the day, an now's the hour:
See the front o battle lour,
See approach proud Edward's power
Chains and Slaverie.

'Wha will be a traitor knave?
Wha will fill a coward's grave?
Wha sae base as be a slave?
Let him turn an flee.

'Wha, for Scotland's king and law,
Freedom's sword will strongly draw,
Freeman stand, or Freeman fa,
Let him on wi me.

'By Oppression's woes and pains,
By your sons in servile chains!
We will drain our dearest veins,
But they shall be free.

'Lay the proud usurpers low,
Tyrants fall in every foe,
Liberty's in every blow!
Let us do or dee.'

Robert Burns statue. - Stirling

Robert Burns statue. - Stirling

Burns poetry on the path. - Stirling

Burns poetry on the path. - Stirling

The Smith Museum and Art Gallery.

We took the hop on hop off bus from the Wallace Monument to Bannockburn. On the way we passed the Smith Museum and Art Gallery which is one of the stops on route. It was not that I was interested in the museum itself. I just noticed it was very close to a great viewing point for the castle, so I walked back to it later that day. I didn't go into the Smith Museum and Art Gallery but noted that it was housed in an attractive building with exhibits in its gardens. The Smith Art Gallery and Museum was originally called the Smith Institute. It was founded as a gallery of contemporary art, museum and library. Today, it has a permenant exhibition on The Stirling Story and temporary exhibitions of art.

King's Park and King's Knot.

I wanted to go to King's Park because it was a good viewing point from which to photograph Stirling Castle. In addition to this there were highland cattle here and I wanted to photograph them, too. In the middle of King's Park stands the King's Knot, a former ornamental garden laid out in 1630. Historically King's Park was used as the hunting ground for the Royal Court at Stirling.

The King's Knot. - Stirling

The King's Knot. - Stirling

The castle from King's Park. - Stirling

The castle from King's Park. - Stirling

The castle from King's Park. - Stirling

The castle from King's Park. - Stirling

Stirling Old Bridge.

Stirling is famous for the Battle of Stirling Bridge in which the heavily outnumbered Scottish forces led by William Wallace defeated the English army sent by Edward I. The bridge in the battle was wooden and no longer exists, it was a little upriver from the site of this lovely old stone bridge. The current stone bridge was built in the sixteenth century and even if it is not the real bridge from the battle, it is still lovely.

Stirling Old Bridge - Stirling

Stirling Old Bridge - Stirling

Stirling Old Bridge - Stirling

Stirling Old Bridge - Stirling

Stirling Old Bridge - Stirling

Stirling Old Bridge - Stirling

The Bridge Clock.

Near Stirling's bridges stands an old clock tower. This was gifted to the people of Stirling in 1910 by David Bayne, who was then provost of Stirling. The clock originally stood at the corner of Wallace Street and Union Street but was moved to its present location due to road development.

The Bridge Clock Tower. - Stirling

The Bridge Clock Tower. - Stirling

The Toll Booth and Mercat Cross.

The Tolbooth and the Mercat Cross are located on Broad Street on the way up to the castle. The area around the Mercat Cross was the site of the town's marketplace. The unicorn figure on top of the cross is known as the puggy. The first Tolbooth was built around 1550. It was the court house, council meeting place, armoury and prison. The present Tollbooth was built around 1703 by Sir William Bruce to replace the old one which had fallen in to disrepair. This area was quiet this visit, but I remember visiting when it was the site of the mediaeval market long ago. I am not sure if this still takes place.

The tollbooth tower. - Stirling

The tollbooth tower. - Stirling

The tollbooth tower. - Stirling

The tollbooth tower. - Stirling

The Tollbooth and Mercat Cross. - Stirling

The Tollbooth and Mercat Cross. - Stirling

The marketplace. - Stirling

The marketplace. - Stirling

Stirling

Stirling

Stirling

Stirling

Argyll's Lodging.

I have never been in here, but have passed it frequently. Argyll's Lodging is a seventeenth century town house situated below Stirling Castle. It was once a residence of the Earl of Stirling and later the Earls of Argyll. It is assumed that the original house was built by the wealthy merchant John Traill who sold it to Adam Erskine, the Commendator of Cambuskenneth Abbey. In 1629, Sir William Alexander, bought the house from the Erskines. He is chiefly remembered for his settlement of the colony of Nova Scotia. In 1630 he became 1st Earl of Stirling and Viscount Canada. In the 1660's the house was sold to Archibald Campbell, 9th Earl of Argyll. In 1746, during the Jacobite rebellion, the Duke of Cumberland resided in the house. Around 1800 the Army bought the house for use as a military hospital.

Argyll Lodgings - Stirling

Argyll Lodgings - Stirling

The Atheneum

The Atheneum is a very distinctive looking building that you will pass on the walk up to the castle. It has a clock tower and a statue of Scottish patriot, William Wallace. The Athenaeum, was designed by the architect William Stirling of Dunblane, in 1817. It was originally a library and meeting house.

The Atheneum. - Stirling

The Atheneum. - Stirling

Cambuskenneth Abbey.

The first day we stayed with our friends in Stirling we took a walk to Cambuskenneth Abbey. This was my second visit. I first visited many years ago as a teenager. Cambuskenneth Abbey is situated in the village of Cambuskenneth about a mile from the centre of Stirling. This abbey was founded around 1140 by King David I. It was the scene of Robert the Bruce’s parliaments in 1314 and 1326. It is the final resting place of King James III of Scotland and his wife, Queen Margaret of Norway, also known as Queen Margaret of Denmark. They were buried here in the 1480s. King James III was an unpopular king and is believed to have been murdered. Today the abbey's bell tower, parts of its walls and its graveyard still remain.

Cambuskenneth Abbey. - Stirling

Cambuskenneth Abbey. - Stirling

Cambuskenneth Abbey. - Stirling

Cambuskenneth Abbey. - Stirling

Cambuskenneth Abbey. - Stirling

Cambuskenneth Abbey. - Stirling

The grounds of Cambuskenneth Abbey. - Stirling

The grounds of Cambuskenneth Abbey. - Stirling

The grave of James III. - Stirling

The grave of James III. - Stirling

The Wallace Monument.

The Wallace Monument stands on top of Abbey Craig in the Causewayhead area of Stirling. This monument commemorates the life of Scottish hero and patriot Sir William Wallace. William Wallace was born around 1270, either at Elderslie near Paisley or Ellerslie in Ayrshire. Wallace rose up against the oppression of his countrymen by the English during the reign of Edward I, also known as the Hammer of the Scots. Edward I sent John de Warenne, the Earl of Surrey, to quell Wallace's rebellion in September 1297. Warenne had a huge army and expected an easy victory. Wallace encamped with his army at Abbey Craig. He attacked the English at their most vulnerable point when they were crossing Stirling Bridge which was only wide enough for two horsemen to pass side by side. Wallace waited until more than half the English had made the crossing then attacked the divided army. More than 100 men at arms and 5,000 Welsh infantry were caught and slaughtered by the Scottish forces. Sadly William Wallace was later betrayed and captured. He was taken to London, where he was tried. He was found guilty, hanged, disemboweled, beheaded, and quartered on 23rd August 1305. The Monument tells the story of Wallace's eventful life. I have been in it earlier, but this time just climbed up to it and enjoyed its views. There is a free shuttle from the Wallace Monument shop and ticket office up to the monument itself. The Wallace Monument is a stop on Stirling's hop on hop off bus.

William Wallace. - Stirling

William Wallace. - Stirling

View from the monument. - Stirling

View from the monument. - Stirling

The Wallace Monument - Stirling

The Wallace Monument - Stirling

View on the climb up from Causewayhead. - Stirling

View on the climb up from Causewayhead. - Stirling

Stirling

Stirling

Stirling

Stirling

Branwell Monument.

Near the roundabout at Causewayhead stands a little known monument. It consists of a silver sculpture with a 3 ft wingspan on top of a stone cairn. It commemorates the first flight to be made in Scotland. The flight was made by Harold Barnwell, an aviation pioneer. He was born in Lewisham in south east London, but brought up at Elcho House in Balfron, Stirlingshire. He had a younger brother, Frank. Together Frank and Harold Barnwell built a glider in 1905. They went on to build three powered aircraft. The second of these, a canard biplane was successfully flown from a field in Causewayhead under the Wallace Monument on the 28th of July 1909. Piloted by Harold, it only flew 75 m before it crashed, but it was still Scotland's first flight. The Branwell brothers opened the Grampian Engineering and Motor Company in 1906 at Causewayhead in Stirling

The Branwell monument. - Stirling

The Branwell monument. - Stirling

The Legend of the Howling Wolf.

When I was looking at the statue of Rob Roy in Stirling, I noticed a statue of a sword and what I thought was a howling dog behind it. I could find out nothing about it. Starting to do this page, I've realised the statue is of a howling wolf, not a dog and is there because of an old legend. Over a thousand years ago, Viking warriors decided to attack the small community of Cumbrian Celts who had settled near the River Forth on the site of present day Stirling. In the middle of the night, the Norsemen crept up on the sleeping Celts, but one accidentally trod on the paw of a sleeping wolf cub. The cub howled in pain and the whole wolf pack joined in. The noise woke the Celts who grabbed their swords to fight the wolves, then discovered that the wolves had alerted them to the Viking invaders. They added a wolf to their flags and banners and the wolf has been Stirling’s Protector ever since.

The howling wolf. - Stirling

The howling wolf. - Stirling

The howling wolf. - Stirling

The howling wolf. - Stirling

The howling wolf. - Stirling

The howling wolf. - Stirling

The howling wolf. - Stirling

The howling wolf. - Stirling

Stirling Whisky Shop.

Stirling Whisky Shop is located within the Stirling Highland Hotel on Spittal Street. If you are a fan of whisky, you may want to check it out. It advertises daily in store whisky tastings. If, like me you are not a fan of whisky don't worry, it also sells gins, vodka, liquors, cognac and beers. Open Daily: Mon -Sat 10am - 6pm; Sun 11am - 4pm. Address: 29 Spittal Street, Stirling

Stirling Whisky Shop. - Stirling

Stirling Whisky Shop. - Stirling

Pubs and Food.

The Golden Lion Hotel: The Golden Lion Hotel.

The Golden Lion Hotel is located on King's Street in the centre of Stirling. It's a historic hotel and one of our favourite places in Stirling to grab a drink. The food looks nice here, too, though I have never actually eaten here. The Golden Lion was built around 1786, as a coaching inn. One of its most notable guests was Robert Burns who inscribed a poem on one of its panes of glass.

The Golden Lion Hotel. - Stirling

The Golden Lion Hotel. - Stirling

William Wallace Pub.

The William Wallace pub is located near the roundabout in Causewayhead. It is very close to our friends' house, so we made it our local when we stayed with them for a few days in the summer. It's a friendly pub with a good selection of drinks. Happy to return there on our next visit.

The William Wallace Pub. - Stirling

The William Wallace Pub. - Stirling

Number 2 Baker Street.

We love this pub because on an earlier attempt to wander Stirling and take photos for a V.T. page, we made it as far as this pub in the torrential rain and spent our time drinking and using their free wifi rather than wandering around getting soaked. This is a friendly pub with good beer. It also serves a wide range of pub food. Menu looks interesting, but we have not eaten here yet.

Corrieries.

Our friends live near an Italian restaurant called Corrieries in Causewayhead. They do pizzas, pastas, British food like fish and chips and they make their own ice-cream.

A night out in Corrieri's. - Stirling

A night out in Corrieri's. - Stirling

Transport in Stirling.

The hop on hop off bus.

We spent a few days living in Causewayhead this summer and decided to make use of the hop on hop off bus on one of these days as we were near the Wallace monument and it stops there. A day ticket cost four pounds fifty and we bought it from the driver. A child's ticket is two pounds fifty. As well as going to the Wallace Monument the bus goes to Bannockburn, Stirling Castle, the Smith Art Gallery and Museum, the thistle shopping centre and Stirling Station. The bus number is 1314 date of the Battle of Bannockburn. The great thing about this service is that your ticket for it is valid on any first bus service, so we used it to return to Causewayhead on a local bus after the hop on hop off bus had finished for the day.

Stirling Train Station.

Stirling can be reached easily by train from either Glasgow or Edinburgh. Fastest journey times from Glasgow are around half an hour. Fastest journey times from Edinburgh are around fifty minutes. The train station is near the bus station, the Thistles Shopping Centre and not far from the old town.

Stirling train station. - Stirling

Stirling train station. - Stirling

There are also many interesting places to visit nearby Stirling.

The University of Stirling.

Our friends live near the University of Stirling and we sometimes go there to play putting or swim in their swimming pool which is open to the general public. The University of Stirling is situated on the grounds of the lovely Airthrey Estate. Airthrey Casle is now one of the university buildings.

The University of Stirling

The University of Stirling

The University of Stirling.

The University of Stirling.

Bridge of Allan.

Bridge of Allan is very close to Stirling. It lies at the foot of the Ochil Hills on the Allan Water, a tributary to the River Forth. The campus of Stirling University is located on Airthrey Estate near here. Authors Robert Louis Stevenson and Charles Dickens were regular visitors here in the past. Our main reason to visit is the wonderful Allanwater Brewhouse which brews a fine beer.

The Allan Water - Stirling

The Allan Water - Stirling

Is it an egret or a cormorant?  - Stirling

Is it an egret or a cormorant? - Stirling

The Allan Water - Stirling

The Allan Water - Stirling

The Bridge of Allan brewery - Stirling

The Bridge of Allan brewery - Stirling

I know that barman!!! - Stirling

I know that barman!!! - Stirling

Dumyat.

Stirling nestles at the foot of the Ochil Hills. The tallest of these is Dumyat and a walk up to its summit can be very enjoyable on a dry day. Dumyat's name means Dun hill fort, as the fort of the Maeatae was once located here. Dumyat is 418 metres high. It has two summits: Castle Law with the fort remains on the west, and Dumyat proper on the east. There are good views from the top.

Dumyat

Dumyat

Dumyat

Dumyat

Dumyat

Dumyat

Callander.

Callander is a pretty little town in Central Scotland. Our friends took us here by car, but you can also come by bus. Callander has a church, a war memorial, lots of teahouses and craft shops. We stopped off here for lunch then went for a stroll along the beautiful banks of the River Teith. Callander is where the TV series Doctor Findlay's Casebook was filmed.

Church in the centre of Callander - Callander.

Church in the centre of Callander - Callander.

The River Teith. - Callander.

The River Teith. - Callander.

On the River Teith. - Callander.

On the River Teith. - Callander.

The minions are here. - Callander.

The minions are here. - Callander.

The Bracklinn Falls.

The Bracklinn Falls are not in Stirling itself. They are near the town of Callander. Our friends took us here by car. If you don't have a car, you can get to Callander by bus and the falls are about a 1km walk from there. The Bracklinn Falls are pretty waterfalls on the River Keltie. They were visited and admired by Queen Victoria. They are best viewed from the bridge that crosses the River Keltie.

The Bracklinn Falls.

The Bracklinn Falls.

The River Keltie.

The River Keltie.

A visit with friends.

A visit with friends.

The bridge by the falls.

The bridge by the falls.

The River Keltie.

The River Keltie.

A pleasant spot for lunch.

A pleasant spot for lunch.

Bannockburn.

We took the hop on hop off bus to Bannockburn. We have been before and paid to go into the Bannockburn Experience which is worth doing. This visit we just visited the gift shop, looked at paintings of the battle and tried on medieval clothes in the dressing up room. We also walked out to the battlefield site which has an equestrian statue of King Robert the Bruce. The Battle of Bannockburn was fought on the 24th of June 1314. In this battle Scottish king, Robert the Bruce, defeated the English forces of King Edward II, despite being outnumbered two to one. Robert the Bruce used several cunning battle strategies. He ordered hundreds of holes to be dug at a crucial point where the English army was advancing. These small holes were capable of snapping horse's legs. They were so dangerous, the cavalry had to stick to a narrow Roman road which left them defensively vulnerable to an attack. Robert the Bruce also ordered his troops to make a schiltron a body of troops wielding long pikes on three levels. This was virtually impregnable to a heavy horse charge. Although he defeated the English at Bannockburn, Robert the Bruce had to wait another 14 years for the king's son, Edward III, to recognise him as the rightful king of an independent Scotland. Bruce died just one year later, in 1329. The Bannockburn Experience: adult £11.50, Child/concession £8.50 . Opening times: Site: all year, daily until dusk.

The dress up room. - Stirling

The dress up room. - Stirling

Battle scene - Stirling

Battle scene - Stirling

Captured Englishman in the stocks. - Stirling

Captured Englishman in the stocks. - Stirling

View over the battlefield. - Stirling

View over the battlefield. - Stirling

King Robert the Bruce. - Stirling

King Robert the Bruce. - Stirling

Posted by irenevt 05:35 Archived in Scotland Comments (6)

Paisley - Town of Weavers.

Paisley Abbey

Paisley Abbey

Paisley - Town of Weavers.

Paisley is the largest town in Scotland. It is situated on the banks of the White Cart River about seven miles west of Glasgow. Paisley began life around the sixth or seventh century when Saint Mirin built a chapel here. In 1163 this site developed into a Clunaic priory and then in 1245 this priory was raised in status and became an Abbey. Paisley Abbey was an important religious centre for the Scottish royal houses of Bruce and Stewart. Paisley Abbey is a beautiful building and is well worth visiting. During the Industrial Revolution in the late eighteenth century, Paisley became an important centre for the production of thread. Later it became a centre for weaving. It was especially famous for weaving paisley pattern shawls. This pattern consisting of tear drop shapes actually originated in Persia. Two prominent families dominated the textile industry in Paisley the Clarks and the Coats.

The old centre of Paisley is in the Oakshaw area close to Gilmour Street Station. It is easy to explore on foot. It has a wealth of historical buildings and amazingly is not visited by many tourists. In fact on the tourist front Paisley is almost a forgotten town. I think this is partly due to Paisley's reputation for being quite rough in certain areas. While Paisley, along with everywhere else does have its problems, the old town centre is a wonderful and rewarding place to visit.

Paisley War Memorial.

We exited Gilmour Street Station and walked straight ahead towards the city centre; the first site we passed was the Paisley War Memorial. The War Memorial is located at the junction of Gilmour Street and Moss Street. The memorial depicts a knight in armour sitting on a horse. Four more modern soldiers from the two world wars trudge along beside him. Perhaps this is meant to show that war is with us always.The war memorial was unveiled on Sunday 27th July 1924. There are no names of the fallen on the memorial.

Paisley War Memorial

Paisley War Memorial

Paisley War Memorial

Paisley War Memorial

Dunn Square.

On the banks of the White Cart Water just across the road from the war memorial stands Dunn Square. The square is a pleasant open area with good views towards the town hall and the abbey. The square contains several statues including Queen Victoria, Thomas Coats and Peter Coats who were wealthy Paisley mill owners and a mother and children statue which commemorates William Dunn, 1st Baronet of Lakenheath and Liberal MP to Paisley.

Dunn Square

Dunn Square

Dunn Square

Dunn Square

Dunn Square

Dunn Square

Paisley Abbey.

Paisley Priory was founded in 1163 when Walter Fitzalan, the High Steward of Scotland, signed a charter allowing the founding of a Cluniac monastery on land he owned in Renfrewshire. After the signing of the charter, thirteen Clunaic monks came to Scotland from Much Wenlock in Shropshire to set up a priory. Their priory was to stand on the site of an old Celtic church founded by St. Mirin in the sixth century. In 1245, the priory became an Abbey dedicated to St. Mary, St. James, St. Mirin, the patron saint of Paisley and St. Milburga, the patron saint of Wenlock. William Wallace, one of Scotland's national heroes who fought for Scotland's independence, was educated at Paisley Abbey. In 1315 the sixth High Steward, Walter Stewart, married Marjory Bruce. She was the daughter of King Robert the Bruce who defeated the English at Bannockburn. In 1316, after just one year of marriage, Marjory suffered a terrible riding accident. She was pregnant at the time of the accident. Her injured body was carried to Paisley Abbey where an early form of caesarian section was performed on her to save her baby. Her baby survived and grew up to be King Robert II of Scotland. Marjory died and is buried in the abbey. King Robert II was the first of the Stewart monarchs. Paisley Abbey is sometimes referred to as the 'cradle of the Royal Stewarts'. Paisley Abbey is the final resting place of six High Stewards of Scotland, Princess Marjory Bruce as well as the wives of King Robert II and King Robert III. During the Scottish Reformation in 1560 Paisley Abbey was disbanded and over time fell into ruins. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries the abbey was restored.

Paisley Abbey

Paisley Abbey

Paisley Abbey

Paisley Abbey

Paisley Abbey

Paisley Abbey

Inside Paisley Abbey.

Paisley Abbey is free to enter though you can give an optional donation towards the abbey's upkeep. The abbey is beautiful inside with many wonderful stain glass windows. I liked the pews that had arm rests carved to look like animals. There was an exhibition inside the abbey about the Paisley drain. This was found by archaeologists from Glasgow University and gives an indication of the abbey's original size with all its outlying buildings which have long since disappeared. The abbey has a gift shop and cafe, too.

Inside Paisley Abbey

Inside Paisley Abbey

Inside Paisley Abbey

Inside Paisley Abbey

Inside Paisley Abbey

Inside Paisley Abbey

Inside Paisley Abbey

Inside Paisley Abbey

Paisley Town Hall.

Paisley Town Hall is an impressive building located on the banks of the White Cart Water near the Paisley Abbey. George A.Clark, one of the Clarks who owned Paisley's thread mills, left £20,000 in his will to the people of Paisley in 1873 so they could build a town hall. Paisley Town Hall was officially opened in January 1882. It is used as an entertainment venue.

Paisley Town Hall

Paisley Town Hall

Paisley Town Hall

Paisley Town Hall

Paisley Town Hall

Paisley Town Hall

Paisley Museum And Art Gallery.

Paisley Museum and Art Gallery is situated on High Street next to the library. When we visited it was being renovated and the art gallery part was closed, so we only visited the museum. The exhibits in the main hall were a real mixed bag with stuffed lions and iguanadon footprints, Ancient Egypt and local history. The local history part had exhibits on Paisley during the Second World War and local disasters such as the Paisley Canal disaster and the Glen Cinema Disaster. The Paisley Canal Disaster occurred on the 10th of November 1810. A new canal boat, The Countess of Eglinton, had started operating on Paisley Canal. It could carry 150 passengers and travelled from Paisley to Johnstone. It was pulled along the canal by two horses. The new boat caused such excitement in the town that too many people rushed to get on it causing the boat to capsize. Passengers and crew were thrown into the icy canal waters. Few could swim; many were children who worked in the mills. 85 people drowned in the canal on that day. The Glen Cinema disaster occurred on the afternoon of 31st December 1929. The cinema was filled with children watching a children's matinee. A freshly shown film was put in its canister and the canister began to emit thick black smoke. As the cinema filled with smoke, the children panicked and tried to run out of the cinema but the exits had been padlocked in the ensuing chaos seventy children were crushed to death. The museum also housed a temporary exhibition of rock photography by Harry Papadopolous. A final room contained exhibits about weaving including a loom and Paisley pattern shawls and clothes. The museum is free to enter and has clean toilets. The Coats Observatory is situated behind the museum. The museum is housed in an attractive old building which opened in 1871. It was designed by Glasgow architect John Honeyman and was paid for by local mill owner Sir Peter Coats. The museum is open Tues to Sat 11am to 4pm and Sun 2pm to 5pm.

Paisley Museum And Art Gallery

Paisley Museum And Art Gallery

Paisley Museum And Art Gallery

Paisley Museum And Art Gallery

Paisley Museum And Art Gallery

Paisley Museum And Art Gallery

Paisley Museum And Art Gallery

Paisley Museum And Art Gallery

Paisley Museum And Art Gallery

Paisley Museum And Art Gallery

The Thomas Coats Memorial Church

This church is just a short walk past the museum. It is a beautiful building and looked very impressive from the outside. Unfortunately it was closed when we visited. The Thomas Coats Memorial Church is a baptist church and is sometimes referred to as the Baptist Cathedral of Europe. It was built in 1894 and the construction was funded by close family members of Thomas Coats following his death.

The Thomas Coats Memorial Church

The Thomas Coats Memorial Church

The Thomas Coats Memorial Church

The Thomas Coats Memorial Church

The Thomas Coats Memorial Church

The Thomas Coats Memorial Church

The Oakshaw Trinity Church.

Paisley's old town is filled with churches. Another attractive one is the Oakshaw Trinity Church. This church is set on a hill above High Street. It has a small graveyard. The Hutcheson's Charity School is next to the church. The church was closed when we visited.

The Oakshaw Trinity Church

The Oakshaw Trinity Church

The Oakshaw Trinity Church

The Oakshaw Trinity Church

The Oakshaw Trinity Church

The Oakshaw Trinity Church

The Oakshaw Trinity Church

The Oakshaw Trinity Church

The White Cart Water.

Paisley is situated on the White Cart Water. This joins together with the Black Cart Water to form the River Cart. The River Cart is a short river which flows into the River Clyde opposite the town of Clydebank.

The White Cart Water

The White Cart Water

The White Cart Water

The White Cart Water

Posted by irenevt 05:55 Archived in Scotland Comments (2)

Arran - Scotland in Miniature.

The Beautiful Isle of Arran.

Hiking

Hiking

The Isle of Arran.

Arran is one of my absolute favourite places in Scotland. I have been there four times. On my first visit I was still a child ­ about eleven or twelve years old. My parents took me and my sister to Arran on a week long bus tour. We had a very friendly driver called Donald and we visited everywhere on the island, plus took the ferry from Lochranza to Claonaig and visited Campbeltown and Davaar Island. On that holiday our accommodation was in Brodick. I remember loving the peacefulness and safety of the island as well as all the greenery, open spaces and wild life. I did not want to leave.

On our second visit we went for a few days holiday again. This time I was with my husband and two friends we often travel with. We had accommodation in Whiting Bay. Our friends had brought their car with them, so again we were able to get around easily. We also did a bit of walking to enjoy the countryside. As the weather was fantastic on this visit, we even braved a swim in the sea, though I must admit that was freezing and brief.

On visit three we took my parents for a day trip to Arran and took the bus tour round the island. Visit four was this summer. Our friends had gone to Arran for a family holiday complete with their son and their dog and we went over for the day to visit them.

Arran is a magical place. It is known as Scotland in miniature as it has all the things Scotland has to offer squeezed into a smaller scale. There are mountains, glens, castles, ruined castles, beautiful coastline, islands off the coast, golf, fishing, hiking, sailing, religious retreats, wild deer, highland cattle, distilleries, breweries, cheese making factories, fishing villages and much more. Arran is the largest island in the Firth of Clyde. It has an area of 432 square kilometres or 167 square miles, making it is the seventh largest Scottish island.

Arran has been continuously inhabited since the Neolithic period and has prehistoric remains such as standing stones, stone circles and stone cairns. The best place to visit these is on Machrie Moor. In the Bronze and Iron Ages Arran was part of the kingdom of Dalriada. Its Gaelic speaking inhabitants were ruled from Ireland. Christianity arrived on the island in the sixth century when Saint Brendan, patron saint of sailors, founded a monastery at Kilpatrick. Saint Columba is also believed to have visited Arran. Later his disciple Saint Molois found retreat in a cave on the Holy Isle. The Holy Isle is nowadays a centre of Buddhist Retreat. By 800 AD Arran was undergoing a long period of Viking domination. Viking domination ended with the Battle of Largs in 1263. In this battle the Scots under Alexander, the fourth Steward of Scotland, defeated the Vikings under Haakon of Norway. In the 1500’s the Hamiltons became the Earls of Arran and settled in Brodick Castle. All was not peaceful however and many power struggles ensued. In the nineteenth century the Highland Clearances caused massive depopulation of the island and marked the end of traditional island life.There is a monument to those who left in the clearances in Lamlash. Nowadays Arran has been revitalized and is a popular tourist destination.

Brodick.

Brodick is the largest town on Arran. It is Arran's main commercial centre and ferry port. Brodick boasts a lovely old castle with beautiful gardens. I visited this as a child, but do not have any recent photos. Brodick Castle was home to the Dukes of Hamilton. The gardens were created in 1923 by the Duchess of Montrose. Brodick also has hotels, restaurants, pubs. You might enjoy visiting the cheese shop and the Arran brewery in Cladach, Brodick.

Brodick

Brodick

Brodick

Brodick

Brodick

Brodick

Brodick Castle.

Brodick Castle is situated just outside Brodick at the base of Goatsfell. The castle's history dates back to the 13th century. It was used as a hunting lodge and summer residense by the Hamiltons and later by the Montroses. Brodick castle is surrounded by beautiful gardens. Like every self­ respecting Scottish castle, Brodick Castle is haunted. People have reported seeing a mysterious Grey Lady. She is believed to be the ghost of a plague victim who died at the castle. A strange man dressed in green and wearing a wig is believed to haunt the library. A lone white stag is rumoured to appear just before a member of the Hamilton family dies.

Brodick Castle

Brodick Castle

Goat Fell.

Goat Fell is the highest point on the Isle of Arran at 874 metres or 2,866 feet high.The mountain's name may mean Mountain of Wind if it derives from Gaelic; or Goat Mountain if it derives from Norse. Goat Fell is very popular with hikers. The most popular route up Goat Fell is a path which starts from near Brodick Castle in Cladach and leads up through the grounds of the castle. At just under 1,000 ft above sea level the path leaves the forest and continues over bare moorland until it reaches the summit by way of the mountain's east ridge. There are good views of Goat Fell from many parts of Arran including Brodick. Goat Fell is now owned by the National Trust of Scotland.

Although Arran is an extremely peaceful place, Goat Fell was the site of a horrific murder in July 1889. Englishman Edwin Rose aged 32 was found battered to death in a hut on Goat Fell. He had been climbing the mountain with Scotsman, John Laurie, aged 25. Laurie had disappeared from the scene and was later found in possession of some of Rose's belongings. Laurie was given a life sentence. He always maintained that Rose fell down the mountain and that he robbed him rather than killed him. No-­one knows for sure what really happened.

Goat Fell

Goat Fell

Goat Fell

Goat Fell

Lochranza.

Lochranza is a little village in the north west of Arran. It is home to about 200 people. It is located on the shores of a small sea loch called Loch Ranza. There is a regular ferry service from here to Claonaig on the mainland. Lochranza is the site of the Arran Distillery. This was built in 1995 and produces the Arran Single Malt. Lochranza has a beautiful ruined castle with a long and eventful history. Lochranza Castle dates from the thirteenth century. It was originally owned by the MacSween family. Then in 1262 King Alexander III gave the castle and its lands to Walter Stewart, the Earl of Menteith. By 1371, the castle was the property of Robert II and was used as a royal hunting lodge. In the 1490s James IV used the castle as a base from which he could fight the Lord of the Isles and the Clan MacDonald. In 1705 Lochranza Castle was purchased by the Hamilton family who also owned Brodick Castle. During the eighteenth century, the castle was abandoned and fell into ruins. The castle now belongs to Historic Scotland.

Lochranza is associated with several legends. One old legend claims that Robert the Bruce landed at Lochranza in 1306 when he returned from Ireland to claim the Scottish throne. Arran is one of the many places that claims to have the cave where Robert the Bruce watched the spider who would not give up. He drew inspiration from its persistence and it motivated him to keep battling the English. Lochranza is also associated with a fairy legend. One day a local midwife was gathering crops from the side of the loch when she suddenly spotted a large yellow frog. One of the women with the midwife wanted to to kill it, but for some reason, the midwife stopped her. The next day the midwife was working at the loch side again. Suddenly out of nowhere a young boy appeared. He was riding on a grey mare. He told the midwife that the yellow frog was really the queen of the fairies in disguise and that as she had saved her, she could have safe passage to the land of the fairies. The midwife mounted the horse and rode into the other world with the young boy where she became a midwife to the fairy queen.

Lochranza is mentioned in a poem written by Sir Walter Scott.

“On fair Lochranza streamed the early day,
Thin wreaths of cottage smoke are upward curl'd
From the lone hamlet, which her inland bay
And circling mountains sever from the world ”

Sir Walter Scott, The Lord of the Isle.

Lochranza

Lochranza

Lochranza

Lochranza

Lochranza

Lochranza

Lochranza

Lochranza

The Twelve Apostles At Catacol.

The lovely village of Catcol has a row of twelve fishermen's cottages. These are known as the twelve apostles. Each cottage has a different upper window from all the other houses. This enabled the fishermen's wives to place lights in the window and send signals to their husbands while they were out fishing. The men could tell exactly who was signalling them.

The Twelve Apostles At Catacol

The Twelve Apostles At Catacol

Village Of Lagg.

Lagg is a very small village on Arran. It consists of a few houses, a shop, a hotel and a post office. There are a couple of burial cairns here next to the river. The Lagg hotel is one of the oldest hotels on the Isle of Arran. It has been open since 1791.

Village Of Lagg

Village Of Lagg

The Holy Isle.

The Holy Isle is just off the east coast of Arran in Lamlash Bay. The island is 1.9 miles long and 0.6 miles wide. Its highest point is a hill called Mullach Mòr. The island has always been a sacred place and has a holy well with healing properties. Saint Molaise, a sixth century monk, lived as a hermit in a cave on this island. There is also evidence that a monastery was located here in the thirteenth century. It is believed that the Viking fleet sheltered between Arran and Holy Isle before the Battle of Largs. The Holy Isle is now owned by a Tibetan Buddhist organisation and runs retreats. Parts of the island are a nature reserve with Eriskay ponies ­ a gray coloured pony native to Scotland, Saanen goats ­- white or cream coloured goats originally from Switzerland and Soay sheep ­ - a primitive breed of domesticated sheep that are native to St Kilda. A very rare kind of tree known as the Rock Whitebeam tree can also be found here. A ferry service runs from Lamlash to the Holy Isle.

The Holy Isle

The Holy Isle

The Holy Isle

The Holy Isle

Blackwaterfoot.

Blackwaterfoot Village is located where the Clauchan Water flows over natural rock weirs then under a stone bridge into the sea. If you are hungry or thirsty, you can visit the Kinloch Hotel here. Blackwaterfoot lies at the the western end of the String Road which was built across Arran in 1817 by Thomas Telford. The eastern end of the road is located near Brodick. Near Blackwaterfoot is the King's Cave where Robert the Bruce watched a spider trying to climb up a wall. The spider kept slipping down then trying again and again. The persistence of the spider inspired him to continue fighting the English eventually defeating them at Bannockburn and driving them out of Scotland.

Blackwaterfoot

Blackwaterfoot

Wild Deer.

Arran is home to large herds of wild deer. We were delighted to pass a golf course absolutely covered everywhere in a herd of them. They seemed really tame and totally at ease in their surroundings and not bothered by a human audience.

Wild Deer

Wild Deer

Wild Deer

Wild Deer

Wild Deer

Wild Deer

Wild Deer

Wild Deer

Family Of Swans.

This lovely family of swans swam right up to us. I was surprised to see such a large number of cygnets. They really brightened up our day. Arran is a very good place to enjoy wildlife and nature in many forms.

Family Of Swans

Family Of Swans

Family Of Swans

Family Of Swans

Family Of Swans

Family Of Swans

Seals.

It is quite common as you travel around Arran to see seals basking on the rocks or playing in the waves. In the little village of Corrie there is even a very cute statue of a basking seal out in the water.

Seals

Seals

Seals

Seals

Seals

Seals

Hiking.

Arran is a wonderful place for hiking. These are some photos from one of the walks we took. As with all of Scotland beware of sudden changes in the weather and bring warm clothing with you -­ layers are your best option.

Hiking

Hiking

Hiking

Hiking

Hiking

Hiking

Hiking

Hiking

Beaches.

Arran has some lovely beaches and beautiful coastline. We braved swimming in Whiting Bay once, but I must admit the water was absolutely freezing even after a spell of lovely hot summer weather. Our swim lasted about five minutes. All of them agonizing.

Beaches And Coastline

Beaches And Coastline

Beaches And Coastline

Beaches And Coastline

Beaches And Coastline

Beaches And Coastline

Old Post Box.

On Arran's string road which runs from near Brodick to the village of Blackwaterfoot there is a lovely old post box. It is made of stone and is quite an unusual shape. It has lots of different symbols carved into its stones.

Old Post Box

Old Post Box

Getting To Arran.

Regular ferries run from Ardrossan Harbour to the Isle of Arran. These ferries link in both directions with a train service from Glasgow Central Station to Ardrossan Harbour. There are summer and winter timetables. The ferries are operated by Caledonian MacBrayne. The first ferry in the morning on the summer timetable departs from Ardrossan at 7am, later on Sundays ­ 9.45 am. The last ferry back to Ardrossan is usually around 7pm ­ 19.20 to be precise, later on Fridays with the last sailing at 21.40. Fares for this service are 6 pounds 75 single. The journey takes about 55 minutes. The ferries serve meals and snacks. They also have a bar where you can get excellent Arran Blonde beer on draft. They also have a souvenir shop on board. The only other ferry service to Arran connects Lochranza to Claonaig. Ferries run seven days a week on the summer timetable. Journey time is thirty minutes. The first ferry leaves Lochranza at 8.15am. The first leaves Claonaig at 8.50am. Last ferries on the summer timetable leave Lochranza at 18.25 and Claonaig at 19.00.

Getting To Arran

Getting To Arran

Getting To Arran

Getting To Arran

Getting To Arran

Getting To Arran

Posted by irenevt 06:13 Archived in Scotland Comments (2)

Where I grew up.

My parents - proud Bankies. - Clydebank

My parents - proud Bankies. - Clydebank

Clydebank - The Town where I Grew Up.

My parents house in the snow. - Clydebank

My parents house in the snow. - Clydebank

I grew up in a town called Clydebank. Clydebank is not a touristy place; it does not have much in the way of sights, but I am writing it a page, because it is where I am from. It seems a shame to write about all these exotic places and have nothing to say about your own town. In making this page I have 2 problems :1/ as I said, not many sights; 2/ I don't know much about Clydebank's history. Well, I cannot do much about 1, but I have been researching 2 and I've found out I knew more than I thought I did and that Clydebank's history is actually quite interesting.

The earliest references I could find mentioned Druid stones with cup and ring markings. Someone wrote about searching for one of these, then finding to her surprise it was buried under the ground. She wondered why. I could have told her...........

As a child I grew up on a fairly non-­descript housing scheme called Faifley, but Faifley did have one redeeming feature. It was right next to some beautiful countryside. I often went walking round the Cochno Road or over the knowes (moors) to Craigton. Sometimes we would go on one of the three remaining old estates on the Cochno Road: Cochno, Edinbarnet and Auchnocraig. Once when I was playing on Auchnacraig Estate, my mum told me, "You are playing right on top of the Druid Stone." Of course, I immediately wanted to see it. "You can't," said my mum. "They reburied it to keep the vandals off it." On­-line I found this reference:

'Evidence of man's prehistoric settlement in the area (Faifley) was found at Auchnacraig in 1887 when the Reverend James Harvey discovered the Druid (or Cochno) Stone. This sandstone rock, some 60 feet in diameter has, possibly, the finest "cup and ring" carvings in existence.'

My other memories of Auchnacraig, apart from its stunning displays of rhododendrons and bluebells, was my mum telling me that during the First World War, when the men were away fighting, her mother became a postwoman and delivered to Auchnacraig Estate. She had to place the mail onto a silver platter that the butler brought for this purpose. Sadly, Auchnacraig House has long since been demolished; the estate is now park land.

Other early history refers to the Ancient Romans. Part of the Antonine Wall passed through here. There was also a fort. Not much remains however, just a few stones from the wall. The outline of the fort is only really visible from the air.

The oldest parts of Clydebank seem to be Duntocher and Hardgate. These villages were built next to the Duntocher Burn (stream) and the inhabitants worked in the textile mills there. As a child I used to play on the remains of an old ruined mill by the burn sometimes. Not sure if it is even still there. Here is some information I found on­line:

Faifley's first industries were attracted to the area by the opportunity to harness the water­power provided by the Loch Humphrey Burn and the Cochno Burn. A waulk mill(mentioned in charters of 1643) and a dye works were in existence when William Dunn (1760–1849) purchased the Faifley Cotton Spinning Co in 1811. Dunn had four large cotton mills on the burn and introduced the first steam engines at Faifley by 1836, at which time he was employing 1,400 workers. The American Civil War resulted in a collapse of Britain's cotton trade with the USA in the 1860s and led to the closure of all but one of the mills.

Most of the land where Clydebank now stands was farmland and much of it was owned by the Hamilton family who lived on Cochno Estate on the Cochno Road. Their estate house still stands and is now part of a vet school owned by the University of Glasgow. I remember going on the estate as a child and being fascinated by the little fenced off graveyard hidden among trees on a little hill there. It contained only three graves: the grave of Claude Hamilton, Henrietta Anne Bruce ­ his wife, and their infant daughters. The slopes around the graveyard were covered in bright yellow daffodils. I think this visit caused me to love daffodils, history and old graveyards!!!! I, of course, wanted to know everything about the people buried there, but at the time could find out nothing. There's actually quite a bit of information on line, however. Here is some:

'The most valuable lands near Faifley were the estates of Cochno, Edinbarnet (Edinbarnet Estate is now a care home for the elderly) and Law. Prior to the Reformation they were, like many Kilpatrick properties, transferred from the ownership of Paisley Abbey to the Hamilton family. Andrew Hamilton, Governor of Dumbarton Castle and Provost of Glasgow, acquired Cochno in 1550 but lost it after siding with Queen Mary at the battle of Langside in 1568. By 1592 the Crown had restored the estates to the Hamiltons. The present house was built in 1757 with additions in 1842.' And from the Cochno Estate website this:

'The information above (about the Hamilton family lineage) was very kindly supplied by Elizabeth Hamilton. Elizabeth was born in 1917 and stayed in Cochno House. She left when she was five to go and live at Polmaise Castle. Elizabeth Hamilton taught watercolours and weaving at The Glasgow School of Art. In April 2002 she presented one of her watercolour paintings to Cochno House where it takes pride of place above the fireplace in the first floor living room. Elizabeth Hamilton's grandfather (Claud Hamilton), his second wife Hon. Henrietta Anne Bruce and two of their children, Nora and Anne Henrietta were originally buried in a small graveyard, sheltered in a wood on Cochno Estate.'

So where did the town come from?

Clydebank is a famous ship building town. I knew that. It is where they built the QE2, the Queen Mary and many more, but the whole town apart from a few little villages (Hardgate, Duntocher, Dalmuir) owes its existence to the ship yards. That I did not know. Here's what I found on­-line to explain how it happened:

J&G Thomson.

'Two brothers — James and George Thomson founded the engineering and shipbuilding company J&G Thomson. The brothers founded the Clyde Bank Foundry in Anderston in 1847. George Thomson died in 1866, followed in 1870 by his brother James. They were succeeded by the sons of their elder brother, also called James and George Thomson. Faced with the compulsory purchase of their shipyard by the Clyde Navigation Trust (which wanted the land to construct the new Princes' Dock), they established a new Clyde Bank Iron Shipyard further downriver at the Barns o' Clyde, near the village of Dalmuir, in 1871. This site at the confluence of the tributary River Cart with the River Clyde allowed very large ships to be launched. The brothers soon moved their iron foundry and engineering works to the same site. Despite intermittent financial difficulties the company developed a reputation based on engineering quality and innovation. The rapid growth of the shipyard and its ancillary works, and the building of housing for the workers, resulted in the formation of a new town which took its name from that of the shipyard which gave birth to it — Clydebank. Prior to the building of Clydebank workers were shipped in to Thompson's Yard on a daily basis. This was inconvenient, so J and G Thompson leased the land around the shipyard to build homes for their workers. They leased it from Grace Hamilton of Cochno Estate.'

Clydebank was born. But the shipbuilding industry is at the mercy of the times. In 1899 the steelmaker John Brown and Company of Sheffield bought J&G Thomson's Clydebank yard for £923,255 3s 3d. John Brown's Yard was responsible for the building of the Queen Elizabeth, the QE2, the Queen Mary, the Royal Yacht, Britannia and many more. During the handover of Hong Kong the royal yacht was in Hong Kong Harbour. When I told my mum, I'd seen it, she said: "That's nothing, I've actually been on it." Turns out due to many family members working on it, she, along with many others, got to visit it, before it was launched from John Browns.

But all this industry brought about the town's destruction, too. On the nights of the 13th and 14th March 1941 Clydebank was blitzed by the German Luftwaffe. Here's what I found on­-line:

'As a result of the raids on the nights of 13 and 14 March 1941, the town(of Clydebank) was largely destroyed and it suffered the worst destruction and civilian loss of life in all of Scotland. 528 people died, 617 people were seriously injured, and hundreds more were injured by blast debris. Out of approximately 12,000 houses, only seven remained undamaged — with 4,000 completely destroyed and 4,500 severely damaged. Over 35,000 people were made homeless.'

My parents lived through the blitz. They survived in the air raid shelters but their homes were destroyed. Amazingly none of my family members died. Following the blitz my mum was evacuated to Renton, my dad to Cardross. They were both 10 years old during the blitz.

There are no major sights in Clydebank, but I have listed one or two places of interest below.

The Forth And Clyde Canal.

The Forth and Clyde Canal flows through the centre of Clydebank. There is a pleasant walkway along it and it is quite a pleasant place for a stroll. Occasionally you can see boats or barges gliding along it.

The Forth And Clyde Canal

The Forth And Clyde Canal

Clydebank Town Hall.

Clydebank town hall was built in 1902. It is now a Category B listed building. It was designed by John Miller. This building has a clock tower, a war memorial and a museum about Clydebank's history. The town hall survived the Clydebank blitz. It is located on Dumbarton Road.

Clydebank Town Hall

Clydebank Town Hall

Clydebank Town Hall

Clydebank Town Hall

Clydebank Museum.

This is a pleasant, friendly museum located inside the town hall. The entrance to it is on Hall Street. Part of the museum deals with the history of Clydebank's Singer Sewing Machine Factory. This was once a major employer in the town. Both my parents and 2 of my grandparents worked here. Singers has long since been demolished. Sadly they also demolished its famous clock tower in 1963. At one time this was a local meeting point and icon. I love the photo of the girls carrying the massive clock hand. The museum also deals with the history of ship building in Clydebank. During my visit there was an exhibition of the works of artist John Lowry Morrison JoLoMo who used to live in Clydebank. The museum is free entry and has a cafe, shop and garden, too.

Clydebank Museum

Clydebank Museum

Clydebank Museum

Clydebank Museum

Clydebank Museum

Clydebank Museum

The hand of the Singer's clock, Clydebank Museum

The hand of the Singer's clock, Clydebank Museum

Clydebank Museum

Clydebank Museum

The Library.

The library is next to the town hall on Dumbarton Road. It is an attractive old building and downstairs it has some old photos of the Clydebank area. At the entrance there is a stain glass window showing Singers clock, the Titan crane and ships.

The Library

The Library

The Library

The Library

Solidarity Square.

This square faces onto the town hall. It is a square linking Clydebank with Poland. Both places relied on industry and opposed the authorities through striking. There is also a plaque here commemorating a Polish ship that helped defend Clydebank during the blitz.

Solidarity Square

Solidarity Square

Solidarity Square

Solidarity Square

Solidarity Square

Solidarity Square

Houses Above The Park Bar.

This tenement block is on Dumbarton Road on the corner of Agamemon Street. I think it is a listed building. It has a small turret and interesting carvings. One of them links to Clydebank's ship building past.

Houses Above The Park Bar

Houses Above The Park Bar

Houses Above The Park Bar

Houses Above The Park Bar

The Beardmore Sculpture.

Beardmore was at one time a well­-known ship building firm in Clydebank. Their elaborate metal sculpture commemorates Clydebank's ship building past. It is worth taking a look at if you happen to be in the area.

The Beardmore Sculpture

The Beardmore Sculpture

The Titan Crane.

The Titan Crane was once part of John Brown's Ship Building. It was kept after the closure of the site. Now you can go up it for spectacular Clyde views. I have not gone up it yet, but believe you can see a long way from the top.The Titan Crane

The Titan Crane

The Titan Crane

The Titan Crane

The Clyde.

When I was a child you could not see the River Clyde in Clydebank as its banks were lined with industry, mainly ship building yards. That's all gone and now you can stroll along the Clyde Walkway enjoying the riverside views.

The Clyde

The Clyde

The Clyde

The Clyde

Dalmuir Public Park.

I frequently moan about things in Britain, but one thing we definitely do an outstanding job of is our parks. Well­ kept, colourful, free, facilities for children, lots of space, greenery. When travelling overseas, I have paid to go into parks that were not a patch on a British public park, for example, in Burma. Dalmuir Public Park was somewhere I loved to visit as a child. The area used to be filled with paper mills along the stream. Now it is a park complete with duck pond, waterfall, the forget-­me­-not boat, (It was covered in forget­-me-­nots when I was a child, now it has other flowers). It also has a monument to a young man who died trying to save a young child who had crawled onto the nearby railway line. The monument used to be in bronze but that was sadly stolen, then replaced. There's a lovely old fountain and now there is a monument to the Singer's clock.

Dalmuir Public Park

Dalmuir Public Park

Dalmuir Public Park

Dalmuir Public Park

Dalmuir Public Park

Dalmuir Public Park

Dalmuir Public Park

Dalmuir Public Park

Dalmuir Public Park

Dalmuir Public Park

The High Park.

This may have another official name, but everyone calls it the High Park. It is basically a big grassy hill with good views, including views over the town, views of the Old Kilpatrick Hills and views towards Erskine Bridge.

The High Park

The High Park

The High Park

The High Park

The High Park

The High Park

The High Park

The High Park

Clydebank Blitz Memorial.

On the nights of the 13th and 14th March 1941 Clydebank was blitzed by the German Luftwaffe. As a result of these raids the town of Clydebank was largely destroyed. 528 people died, 617 people were seriously injured, and hundreds more were injured by blast debris. Out of approximately 12,000 houses, only seven remained undamaged — with 4,000 completely destroyed and 4,500 severely damaged. Over 35,000 people were made homeless. This terrible tragedy is commemorated in Old Dalnottar Cemetery by a plaque.

Clydebank Blitz Memorial.

Clydebank Blitz Memorial.

Clydebank Blitz Memorial.

Clydebank Blitz Memorial.

Auchentoschan Distiliary.

I am not a whisky fan. I only drink it laced with hot water if I have the cold or a flu, but Clydebank has its own whisky distillery open to the public for tours. Auchentoshan boasts that its whisky is triple distilled.

Auchentoschan Distiliary

Auchentoschan Distiliary

Auchentoschan Distiliary

Auchentoschan Distiliary

McGonagles: Fish and Chips on the Canal.

McMonagles restaurant is a boat moored on the Forth and Clyde Canal in the centre of Clydebank next to the Clyde Shopping Centre. It is a fully licensed restaurant which specializes in fish and chips and has a seating capacity of 80. On the water side it even has a "Sail Thro" take away for passing boats and barges.

McGonagles Restaurant. - Clydebank

McGonagles Restaurant. - Clydebank

Golf and Bowling.

These are both popular sports in Scotland. Clydebank has many bowling greens and two golf courses. Golf is a sport open to all here, unlike in Hong Kong where I now live. There it is a sport of the rich with golf course membership fees that are through the roof and very few public courses.

I grew up in a town called Clydebank. As a child I would often be taken for day trips to Helensburgh or Balloch or Dumbarton during the summer months. These are all on direct train lines from Glasgow lines that pass through Clydebank and so were very easily accessible for us.

Helensburgh.

Walk Along The Waterfront.

Walk Along The Waterfront.

I have been visiting Helensburgh throughout my whole life. In my childhood it was a place we would be taken to on sunny summer days. For us as children it was a trip to the seaside, though really it is situated on the Firth of Clyde. We enjoyed everything. The trip on the train had a series of regular highlights: watch out for our granda's garden, the Erskine Bridge, the ship wrecks at Bowling, Dumbarton Rock, Dumbuck Quarry, the terror of going through the pitch blackness of Dumbarton Tunnel, the shores at Cardross. We would arrive armed with buckets and spades and the rocky, seaweed covered, long, narrow beach seemed like paradise to us, as did the icy dark waters of the River Clyde. There were the baths, the putting green, the pier with its shows, and walks along the waterfront. There was fish and chips devoured from a newspaper while fighting off the screeching gulls. If we were good, later there would be ice-cream cones. The trip on the train home was spent trying to spot rabbits and seeing who could get most before sinking into sleep from all the fresh air and exercise.

Nowadays Helensburgh has changed in some ways and stayed the same in others. We go there for the day frequently when we are back in Scotland. We eat a business man's lunch in the Ruby Chinese Restaurant. We still walk along the waterfront. Sometimes in the sun, sometimes in howling winds, sometimes in driving rain. We have a look in the shops every second one a charity shop, we have a walk along the pier. The Waverley calls in here and it used to be where you caught the ferry to Gourock or Kilcreggan. Sadly this service was discontinued in 2012. Occasionally we visit Hermitage Park or Hill House. I have always associated Helensburgh with John Logie Baird who invented the television and Henry Bell who introduced a successful passenger steamboat service along the River Clyde. He is buried in Rhu. I was surprised to learn that W.H. Auden and Cecil Day Lewis used to teach in a secondary school here.

Here are some things to do in Helensburgh:

Walk Along The Waterfront.

Walk Along The Waterfront.

Walk Along The Waterfront.

The roads at Helensburgh were dug up for a very long time, but fortunately they are now finished. It is pleasant to walk along the walkway on the edge of the River Clyde at Helensburgh. On one side of you there is the river, on the other a long stretch of grass. You will find a statue to John Logie Baird, the inventor of television, here. There are lots of places to sit and look out over the water. This is very pleasant on a warm day, though these are sadly rare. It is also nice to sit in the beer garden of the Commodore Hotel enjoying a pleasant meal or drink.

Getting To Helensburgh By Train.

Getting To Helensburgh By Train.

The Waverley

We were delighted to see the Waverley Passenger Steamer pulling into the end of Helensburgh Pier on our last visit. This steamer takes its name from the Sir Walter Scott novel. The Waverley is the last seagoing passenger paddle steamer in the world. She was built in 1946. Originally she used to sail from Craigendoran near Helensburgh to Arrochar on Loch Long. This continued until 1973. The Waverley is now owned by the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society. She has been restored to her 1947 appearance. She sails to many places such as Arran, Dunoon, Rothesay, Kilcreggan in Scotland. She also tours further afield in the UK. Apparently the Waverley featured in the 2011 film Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows.

The Waverley

The Waverley

The Waverley

The Waverley

The Waverley

The Waverley

Colquhoun Square.

This square is near the waterfront and not far from the station. It has recently been quite nicely done up. There are plenty of places to sit outside on a warm day. Helensburgh Parish Church is located here. This church was formed by the union of the congregations of Park Church and St Andrew’s Kirk.

Colquhoun Square

Colquhoun Square

Hill House.

To get to Hill House, exit the station and turn right. You will be walking away from the waterfront. You have to walk quite far up a steep hill. You will pass Hermitage Park and Helensburgh High Station. Hill House was created by world famous architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh. He designed most of the furniture and fittings within Hill House, while his wife, Margaret Macdonald, designed many of the textiles used in the curtains, sofas, bedding etc. Hill House has been restored to look as it did in 1904. At that time Glasgow publisher Walter Blackie lived here with his family. Hill House is now owned by the National Trust for Scotland. Hill House is set in beautiful flowering gardens.

Hill House

Hill House

Hill House

Hill House

Hermitage Park.

If you exit Helensburgh station and turn right, you will come to a busy main road. Go left on this road and you'll end up at the River Clyde, go right and its a short walk to Hermitage Park. Hermitage Park is a pleasant place for a stroll. It has among other things a swing park for children and an attractive war memorial.

Hermitage Park

Hermitage Park

Hermitage Park

Hermitage Park

Hermitage Park

Hermitage Park

Hermitage Park

Hermitage Park

John Logie Baird Statue.

John Logie Baird was born in Helensburgh in August 1888. He was an engineer and is most famous for having invented the television. There is a statue of him on the waterfront at Helensburgh. Logie Baird died in Bexhill on Sea in East Sussex in 1946. He is buried in Helensburgh Cemetery. Logie Baird experienced the greatest honour of all in Helensburgh, he even has a pub named after him.

John Logie Baird Statue.

John Logie Baird Statue.

John Logie Baird Statue.

John Logie Baird Statue.

The Henry Bell Monument.

Another monument on the waterfront at Helensburgh is the Henry Bell Monument. Henry Bell was born in April 1767. In 1808 Bell and his wife moved to Helensburgh. They bought the public baths and a hotel. Bell's wife managed these businesses, while Bell focussed on his dream of building a steamboat. He built the paddle steamer PS Comet and used it to start Europe's first commercially viable passenger steamboat service on the River Clyde in 1812. The Comet sailed between Glasgow and Greenock. Henry Bell died in November 1830

The Henry Bell Monument.

The Henry Bell Monument.

The Ruby Chinese Restaurant: A Family Tradition.

It has become a family tradition every time we go home that my dad always takes us to the Ruby Chinese Restaurant in Helensburgh for a business man's lunch. He says this cancels out all birthdays and Christmases he has missed while we are in Hong Kong. The food is good and the business man's lunch is good value. I generally have chicken mushroom soup, followed by chicken curry and fried rice. My dad and husband both love the vanilla ice-cream on the lunch deal, but I usually have the Chinese tea or a coffee to finish with instead. The restaurant is licensed and we always have draught sunlik beer with our meal. Service is friendly and efficient.

A Family Tradition.

A Family Tradition.

A Family Tradition.

A Family Tradition.

A Family Tradition.

A Family Tradition.

Balloch.

Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond

The word Balloch comes from the Gaelic word Bealach meaning mountain pass. Balloch is situated on the River Leven and at the southern end of Loch Lomond. You can walk to the loch from Balloch and Balloch is also a starting point for cruises on the loch. I have done these cruises many times, but not recently. One of the new developments at Balloch are the Lomond Shores. This area has shops, loch views, the sealife centre and is home to the Maid of the Loch. The Maid of the Loch is a paddle steamer. I have been on it when I was a child. Sadly it fell into a state of disrepair, but is currently being restored. Being creatures of habit when we visit Balloch we generally have lunch in the lovely Balloch Hotel and then stroll along the River Leven to Loch Lomond. On the way we pass by Balloch Castle perched on its hill.

The River Leven.

The River Leven flows from the southern end of Loch Lomond to the River Clyde at Dumbarton. The river is short, only about six miles long, but it is fast flowing. It is crossed by nine different bridges. At Balloch the River Leven is filled with boats which will be used on nearby Loch Lomond. It is also the starting point for cruises on the loch.

The River Leven

The River Leven

The River Leven

The River Leven

The River Leven

The River Leven

Balloch Castle.

Balloch Castle stands perched on a hill overlooking Loch Lomond. Balloch Castle was built by the earls of Lennox around 1238. This castle was later demolished and replaced by others. The present castle was built around 1809 for John Buchanan of Ardoch, a wealthy Glasgow merchant, by London based architect Robert Lugar.The castle is currently owned by West Dumbartonshire Council. It is derelict and although it is an A listed building, it is on the buildings at risk register. The building has been undergoing repairs since 2014.

Balloch Castle

Balloch Castle

Balloch Castle

Balloch Castle

Loch Lomond.

Loch Lomond is a freshwater loch. It is 24 miles long and varies in width between 0.75 miles and 5 miles. It is surrounded by mountains and is a very beautiful place. There are more than thirty islands within the loch. Loch Lomond, along with Loch Ness, is one of Scotland's most famous lochs. This is in part due to the famous song about it.

By yon bonnie banks and by yon bonnie braes,
Where the sun shines bright on Loch Lomond,
Where me and my true love were ever wont to gae,
In the bonnie, bonnie banks of Loch Lomond.

Chorus:
O ye'll take the high road, and I'll take the low road,
And I'll be in Scotland afore ye,
Where me and my true love will never meet again,
On the bonnie, bonnie banks of Loch Lomond.

'Twas there that we parted, in by yon shady glen,
On the steep, steep side of Ben Lomond,
Where, deep in purple hue, the highland hills we view,
And the moon coming out in the gloaming.

Chorus

The wee birdies sing and the wild flowers spring,
And in sunshine waters lie sleeping.
But the broken heart it kens, nae second spring again,
Though the waeful may cease frae their greeting.

Chorus

No-one really knows the origin of the song, but one theory is it was written by a Jacobite soldier awaiting execution. Apparently captured soldiers who were brothers or close friends were often told one of them was to be executed and the other set free, but they had to decide themselves which one was which. The executed one would return to Scotland on the low road and the free one over the hills on the high road. The idea of the low road to Scotland came from a belief that the fairies transported the souls of dead Scots back to their homeland under the ground.

Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond

Cruises on Loch Lomond.

One popular thing to do in Balloch is to take a cruise on Loch Lomond. I have done this many times, but not recently. Cruises from Balloch are run by Sweeny's Cruises and can be booked from the kiosk next to the bridge over the River Leven. The cruises are on board The Astina, The Silver Marlin, Lomond Duchess and The Silver Dolphin. They depart from near the kiosk. Most of them only operate in the summer season. There are different types of cruises: experience cruises, sunset cruises, island cruises.

Cruises on Loch Lomond

Cruises on Loch Lomond

Cruises on Loch Lomond

Cruises on Loch Lomond

Balloch House Hotel.

When we visit Balloch in the summer, we always eat in the Balloch House Hotel. This is especially enjoyable on a sunny day when you can sit out in the hotel beer garden. This visit my dad had an excellent fish and chips here, I had an excellent chicken and leek pie and my husband had an excellent bacon and brie melt. The Balloch House is an old hotel. It was built in the early 18th Century. It has had a number of famous visitors including; Hans Christian Anderson in 1847 and the Empress Eugenie, wife of Louis Napolean Bonaparte's nephew in 1860. Address: Balloch Rd, Balloch, Dunbartonshire , Balloch, G83 8LQ,

Lovely Meal, Lovely Setting

Lovely Meal, Lovely Setting

Lovely Meal, Lovely Setting

Lovely Meal, Lovely Setting


Dumbarton.

Dumbarton Castle.

I was born in Dumbarton and return there now and again. If you are using Glasgow as a base during your holiday, there are several interesting day trips you could do. One is to take the train to Dumbarton East Station using the low level trains at either Glasgow Central or Queens Street Station. From the station walk to Dumbarton Rock, a dormant volcano with a ruined castle. For around six hundred years Dumbarton was the centre of the ancient Kingdom of Strathclyde. Dumbarton Castle is situated on a large rock near the confluence of the River Leven and the River Clyde. This rock was originally known as the Rock of the Clyde. Later it was called by the Gaelic name Dun Breatann or Fortress of the Britons. Dumbarton comes from this word. In the Middle Ages, Dumbarton Rock was home to a royal castle. This castle was built by Alexander II around 1220 to protect his kingdom from the Norwegians. They occupied much of Scotland until 1263 when they were defeated at The Battle of Largs and driven out. In 1305 when Scotland was fighting against England, William Wallace is believed to have been held prisoner here for a brief period. From here he was taken to London for execution. The Wallace Tower at the castle is named after him. King David II and Mary Queen of Scots both sought shelter at Dumbarton Castle during their troubled reigns. After the Middle Ages Dumbarton Castle became a garrison fortress. Most of the present remains date from this time. The castle last saw military action during the Second World War. From the top of Dumbarton Rock there are spectacular views over Dumbarton and the River Clyde.

Dumbarton Rock And Castle

Dumbarton Rock And Castle

Dumbarton Rock And Castle

Dumbarton Rock And Castle

Dumbarton Rock And Castle

Dumbarton Rock And Castle

Dumbarton Rock And Castle

Dumbarton Rock And Castle

The River Clyde

The River Clyde

The River Clyde

The River Clyde

Posted by irenevt 05:09 Archived in Scotland Comments (6)

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